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AI & Global Governance: Three Paths Towards a Global Governance of Artificial Intelligence - Centre for Policy Research at United Nations University

#artificialintelligence

Inc. shut down a project it had been developing for four years, a recruitment tool driven by machine learning. The concept was a simple and appealing one: at its core, the project aimed to develop an algorithm that would sort incoming job applications to isolate the short list for managers to use in making their final selections. Anyone who has been involved in such a process knows that isolating the top five or ten resumés from dozens of applicants is a time-consuming job. Any process that brings logic and speed to this stage of the recruitment chain can only be a good thing. But algorithms are only as good as the data used to drive them, and in the Amazon case the machine "learning" was based on patterns in applications submitted to the firm in the previous ten years.


Three Paths Towards Global Governance of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Inc. shut down a project it had been developing for four years -- a recruitment tool driven by machine learning. The concept was a simple and appealing one: at its core, the project aimed to develop an algorithm that would sort incoming job applications to isolate the short list for managers to use in making their final selections. Anyone who has been involved in such a process knows that isolating the top five or ten resumés from dozens of applicants is a time-consuming job. Any process that brings logic and speed to this stage of the recruitment chain can only be a good thing. But algorithms are only as good as the data used to drive them, and in the Amazon case the machine "learning" was based on patterns in applications submitted to the firm in the previous ten years.


How do CIOs implement effective AI governance

#artificialintelligence

AI governance is needed to properly monitor and evaluate algorithms for ROI, bias, risk, effectiveness, etc. Unfortunately, due importance is not given to this process. CIOs acknowledge that enterprises often do not take proper measures when drafting AI governance strategies. These governance measures are especially required for monitoring bias, risk, and ROI, among other factors in the enterprise. Enterprise leaders feel that the main reason for this disconnect is the near non-existence of coordination relevant to AI projects in an organization.


Should Artificial Intelligence Governance be Centralised? Design Lessons from History

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Can effective international governance for artificial intelligence remain fragmented, or is there a need for a centralised international organisation for AI? We draw on the history of other international regimes to identify advantages and disadvantages in centralising AI governance. Some considerations, such as efficiency and political power, speak in favour of centralisation. Conversely, the risk of creating a slow and brittle institution speaks against it, as does the difficulty in securing participation while creating stringent rules. Other considerations depend on the specific design of a centralised institution. A well-designed body may be able to deter forum shopping and ensure policy coordination. However, forum shopping can be beneficial and a fragmented landscape of institutions can be self-organising. Centralisation entails trade-offs and the details matter. We conclude with two core recommendations. First, the outcome will depend on the exact design of a central institution. A well-designed centralised regime covering a set of coherent issues could be beneficial. But locking-in an inadequate structure may pose a fate worse than fragmentation. Second, for now fragmentation will likely persist. This should be closely monitored to see if it is self-organising or simply inadequate.


SoftBank to tighten governance standards for firms it invests in: report

The Japan Times

NEW YORK – Following related issues at WeWork, SoftBank Group Corp. will introduce new standards to tighten corporate governance at companies in which it invests, the Financial Times reported Monday. SoftBank is expected to outline the new standards Wednesday, the British newspaper said, citing people briefed on the plan. The tougher governance standards will apply to future investments made by SoftBank. Meanwhile, its Saudi Arabia-backed Vision Fund is in discussions about how it can adopt some or all of these measures, according to the paper. For private companies, SoftBank will look to have at least one board seat, require at least one independent director and prohibit directors from owning "supervoting" shares, the report said.