Perry would bring oil industry ties to Energy Department

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Rick Perry, President-elect Donald Trump's choice for Energy secretary, has close ties to the Texas oil industry and has corporate roles in two petroleum companies pushing to get government approval for the proposed 1,200-mile crude oil pipeline that has stoked mass protests in North Dakota. Perry's current roles as board director at Energy Transfer Partners LP and also at Sunoco Logistics Partners LP, which jointly developed the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project, is a strong indicator of the pro-oil industry sentiment that will likely take root at the Energy Department under his oversight. Perry is close to Texas energy industry executives, and his political campaigns, including two aborted presidential campaigns, benefited substantially from their donations. Energy Transfer's 2016 annual report showed that Perry owned $154,000 worth of partnership units.


What Will Happen to the Gulf Coast If the Oil Industry Retreats?

WIRED

This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. During this year's record-breaking hurricane season, oil rigs and refineries were just as exposed as any structure on the precarious Gulf Coast, and their owners were limited to the same options as everyone else: evacuate, prepare, and hope the storm was merciful. The devastation Harvey and other storms left behind illuminates just how defenseless oil and gas infrastructure is in the face of hurricanes that are growing in magnitude and frequency and challenging the permanence of the oil and gas industry's presence in the Gulf. Harvey shut down 22 percent of the nation's refining capacity, vitally disrupted the oil and gas transportation networks that deliver energy to much of the US, and caused damage to facilities that leaked more than a million pounds of dangerous air pollutants into communities around Texas. The road back to full operational capacity will take weeks, if not months.


Perry brings oil industry ties to Energy Department

PBS NewsHour

Republican presidential candidate and Texas Governor Rick Perry speaks to local residents at the Owe the People: A First in the Nation Freedom Forum town hall event on Oct. 1, 2011, in Hampton, NH. WASHINGTON -- Rick Perry, President-elect Donald Trump's choice for Energy secretary, has close ties to the Texas oil industry and has corporate roles in two petroleum companies pushing to get government approval for the proposed 1,200-mile crude oil pipeline that has stoked mass protests in North Dakota. CEO behind Dakota Access to protesters: 'We're building the pipeline' War whoops and hugs among'water protectors' follow denied permit to Dakota Access Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson will be Trump's Secretary of State War whoops and hugs among'water protectors' follow denied permit to Dakota Access Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson will be Trump's Secretary of State Perry's current roles as board director at Energy Transfer Partners LP and also at Sunoco Logistics Partners LP, which jointly developed the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project, is a strong indicator of the pro-oil industry sentiment that will likely take root at the Energy Department under his oversight. Perry is close to Texas energy industry executives, and his political campaigns, including two aborted presidential campaigns, benefited substantially from their donations. The former Texas governor would not have authority to intervene directly after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' decision last month to delay the pipeline to allow talks with the Standing Rock Sioux and other project opponents.


The Dakota Access Pipeline Should've Happened 10 Years Ago

Slate

The disconnect between production inspired by individual actors and infrastructure that needs collective action to be approved and built is nothing new. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, settlers streamed across the Appalachian Mountains to farm the fertile Ohio River Valley, long before financiers and government officials arranged for the construction of roads and canals that would carry the grain efficiently and economically to New York City and other markets. In the late 1850s and 1860s, oil pioneers started drilling and producing oil in rural Pennsylvania before railroads and pipelines had been built. More recently, entrepreneurs and companies have rushed to build huge wind farms in Texas and the Plains--often far in advance of the construction of transmission lines to carry that power to market. The reality is that mapping out a big interstate infrastructure project takes a degree of planning and coordination between governments and multiple states that isn't necessary when you're just, say, drilling for oil or setting up wind turbines but becomes a requirement once those activities reach a critical mass.


Pipeline Agency at Full Strength as Energy Decision Looms

U.S. News

Longtime energy lawyer Kevin McIntyre was confirmed last month as chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. His installation Thursday brings the commission to a full five members.