RadWagon Review: Finally, an Affordable E-Cargo Bike

WIRED

Many of my car journeys are within a mile of my house, hauling toddlers and groceries to and fro. It would be much easier, more fun, and better for the environment, if I could replace at least a few of those trips with an electric cargo bike. However, a few hurdles stand in my way. I loved the versatility and power of the R&M Load, but at $7,000, it costs as much as my current car. Going completely carless would justify the price, but it's hard to make the commitment.


E-bikes help you get in a workout -- and a breezy commute

Los Angeles Times

The market for pedal-assist electric bicycles is red hot, with well-known bike, car and component name brands like Specialized, Raleigh, BMW, Yamaha, Bosch and Shimano getting in on the action.


Cannondale Slate 105: bike preview

The Guardian

In a world of carbon mania, Cannondale has remained resolutely loyal to the joys of aluminium. In this US builder's hands, it is light, strong, sleek, reliable and – in a frame such as this – just as expensive. But the Slate 105, which has just been crowned Eurobike's'best road bike', is also a true game changer. It is two bikes in one: a road bike designed to go off-road, or maybe a trail bike with a fondness for tarmac. It features unusually relaxed geometry, an eccentric one-armed front suspension fork (called a Lefty Oliver) and a combination of heavy duty disc brakes and a road-going drivetrain.


Orange Diva 2016 bike review: 'It's very Yorkshire: doing a chuffing good job at a fair price'

The Guardian

I belong to two cycling clubs. One is women-only and the other is all-male except me. Team Glow prides itself on female empowerment, encouraging women to achieve more than they ever thought possible: whether riding 112 miles of the Fred Whitton or slogging up the 23% gradient of Mow Cop in Cheshire without putting a foot down. Zero allowances are made for new members' weaknesses. "Stop mithering" is a favourite catchphrase of AK, a founder member.


Injuries Force Lyft to Hit the Brakes on Its E-Bike Ambitions

WIRED

Lyft had high hopes for its shared electric bicycles. Less than two months ago, Lyft bike and scooter policy head Caroline Samponaro wrote that e-bikes were a "a truly transformational technology," citing the cycles' abilities to move riders longer distances with less effort (and less sweat). They might help cities beat traffic and fight pollution. They might help Lyft access a new sort of user, the kind of person who doesn't have the money to take a ride-hail trip every day but might spare around $2 per ride. They might help Lyft become a one-stop-app for urban transportation--and beat rival Uber to the punch.