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MLB's top prospects deal with good, bad of 'robot' umpires

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Oct. 25 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com First baseman Ali Sanchez was standing in the on-deck circle so he had a great vantage point of the two-strike breaking ball to Jacob Heyward. It finished so low that by the time it reached the catcher it nearly bounced in the dirt. Sanchez -- like everybody else who was watching this game on a Tuesday night in the Arizona Fall League -- had an immediate mental reaction.


As MLB's 'robo-ump' experiment unfolds, Atlantic League feeling the benefit – and downside – of an automated strike zone

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

USA TODAY Sports' Gabe Lacques breaks down how MLB is trying computer generated strike zones in the Atlantic League. An automated strike zone that converts the home-plate umpire from arbiter to mere messenger is right far more often than it is wrong. A ban on mound visits and relief specialists undeniably speeds the game's pace. And rules changes aimed to encourage balls in play and runners in motion – Thou shalt not shift defensively, but you may "steal" first base – gives hitters options beyond launching balls over a vexing alignment of fielders. Yet as its experiment with a "robotic" strike zone and other nuances enters its second month, the formal partnership between MLB and the Atlantic League illustrates the upsides and consequences of optimization.


Computer to call balls and strikes in minor league

FOX News

FILE - In this May 13, 2018, file photo, MLB umpire Joe West, right, talks with a player in the ninth inning during a baseball game between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Washington Nationals in Phoenix. West, who has umpired more than 5,000 big league games, said the 2016 TrackMan computer system test was far from perfect. NEW YORK – Get ready for strikes by robots. Computers will be used for ball/strike calls starting April 25 in the independent Atlantic League, where the distance between home and first will be shortened by 3 inches. The ground between the mound and home plate will lengthen by 2 feet for the second half of the season beginning July 12.


Robo-umps are coming to Major League Baseball, and the game will never be the same

#artificialintelligence

The Houston Astros' use of cameras to steal signs and conceivably cheat to win the World Series has driven many recent conversations about the place and meaning of technology in sports. The Major League Baseball season is on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic, but this has only delayed the league addressing the controversy of using technology within the game. New MLB-sponsored technologies, specifically those used to call balls and strikes, will spawn an entirely new set of questions about tech in baseball. These will only heighten the sport's identity crisis. Baseball is a game heavily rooted in its history, and beloved traditions can make it very hard to change any aspect of the game.


Atlantic League to debut robot umpires and allow players to steal first base

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The Atlantic League, an independent baseball league, is rolling out a new revolutionary rule and will debut robot umpires to start the second half of the season. On Wednesday, during the league's All-Star Game in York, Pennsylvania, robots will call balls and strikes for the first time in a professional game, according to The Washington Post. The league will also allow batters to steal first base -- yes, steal first -- on a pitch not caught cleanly, similar to a dropped third strike. Except, the runner can attempt to reach first during any count. Using robots will still include a human element, however.