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Microsoft launches edX curriculum for IT professionals

#artificialintelligence

In a new effort to make IT educational programs available online, Microsoft officially launched its Professional Degree program last week, beginning with a curriculum on data science. Hosted on edX.og, the Harvard- and MIT-founded nonprofit learning site, the program aims to offer an "employer-endorsed, university-caliber curriculum for professionals at any stage of their career," a Microsoft release said. Data science is one of the most sought-after fields within IT right now, with more job openings than there are candidates, so this first curriculum aims to provide students with the skills they need to launch or supplement their careers. "Learn data science fundamentals, key data science tools, and widely-used programming languages from industry and academic experts in this unique program created by Microsoft," edX's curriculum description reads. "But in collaboration with leading universities and employers, the Microsoft Data Science Curriculum will develop the skills employers value by teaching you to explore, transform, model, and visualize data, and to create the next generation of intelligent solutions."


Computer Science in the Curriculum

Communications of the ACM

As I write this, I have just come off a conference call with White House representatives from the Office of Science and Technology Policy including Megan Smith, the U.S. Chief Technology Officer, Thomas Kalil, the Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation, among many others. Highlighted was President Obama's "Computer Science for All" programa that is proposing 4B to the states and 100M directly to expand K–12 computer science in the U.S. by training teachers, providing access to instructional materials, and building regional partnerships. The National Science Foundation (NSFb) and the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCSc) will provide an immediate 135M into the program. The earlier CS10Kd program provided computer science principles and exploring computer science curriculum materials to introduce the subject to students who might not have otherwise considered it. Topics include human-computer interaction, problem solving, Web design, programming, computing and data analysis, and robotics.


What you won't learn in stats classes

@machinelearnbot

There are many topics that you won't learn in statistics classes. Some such as U-Statistics, stochastic geometry, fractal compression, and stochastic differential equations, are for post-graduate people. So it is OK to not find them in statistics curricula. Others like computational complexity and L 1 metrics (to replace R-squared and other outlier-sensitive L 2 metrics such as traditional variance) should be included, in my opinion. But the classic statistics curriculum is almost written in stone.


What you won't learn in stats classes

@machinelearnbot

There are many topics that you won't learn in statistics classes. Some such as U-Statistics, stochastic geometry, fractal compression, and stochastic differential equations, are for post-graduate people. So it is OK to not find them in statistics curricula. Others like computational complexity and L 1 metrics (to replace R-squared and other outlier-sensitive L 2 metrics such as traditional variance) should be included, in my opinion. But the classic statistics curriculum is almost written in stone.


Archbishop of Omaha Endorses New Human Sexuality Curriculum

U.S. News

The curriculum is based on the sexuality teachings of St. John Paul II. It says traditional marriage is the union of a man and a woman and emphasizes that students must have "deep compassion for those confused about their own maleness or femaleness." The curriculum cautions against mistreating or condemning people attracted to the same sex.