BBC fights censorship by launching news site on the dark web

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Government censorship of the internet is an issue in many countries, with officials blocking websites for hosting content which is critical of administrations or that includes unflattering news stories. The BBC is fighting back against such restrictions by making a mirror of its international news website available on the dark web, where it can be viewed using the Tor browser. When accessing the internet using Tor, a person's location and identity is obscured using layers of encryption. The browser can access regular websites more anonymously than other browsers, or it can access hidden sites which have the .onion Typically, the unlisted sites which comprise the dark web are associated with illegal activities, but Tor is also used by activists, journalists and regular people who want to bypass government censorship.


How AI systems can learn and unlearn to beat Internet censorship - Express Computer

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Internet censorship by authoritarian governments prohibits free and open access to information for millions of people around the world. Attempts to evade such censorship have turned into a continually escalating race to keep up with ever-changing, increasingly sophisticated internet censorship. Censoring regimes have had the advantage in that race, because researchers must manually search for ways to circumvent censorship, a process that takes considerable time. New work led by University of Maryland computer scientists could shift the balance of the censorship race. The researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns how to circumvent censorship.


New artificial intelligence system automatically evolves to evade internet censorship

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Internet censorship by authoritarian governments prohibits free and open access to information for millions of people around the world. Attempts to evade such censorship have turned into a continually escalating race to keep up with ever-changing, increasingly sophisticated internet censorship. Censoring regimes have had the advantage in that race, because researchers must manually search for ways to circumvent censorship, a process that takes considerable time. New work led by University of Maryland computer scientists could shift the balance of the censorship race. The researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns how to circumvent censorship.


New artificial intelligence system automatically evolves to evade internet censorship

#artificialintelligence

New work led by University of Maryland computer scientists could shift the balance of the censorship race. The researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns how to circumvent censorship. Tested in China, India and Kazakhstan, Geneva found dozens of ways to circumvent censorship by exploiting gaps in censors' logic and finding bugs that the researchers say would have been virtually impossible for humans to find manually. The researchers will introduce Geneva during a peer-reviewed talk at the Association for Computing Machinery's 26th Conference on Computer and Communications Security in London on November 14, 2019. "With Geneva, we are, for the first time, at a major advantage in the censorship arms race," said Dave Levin, an assistant professor of computer science at UMD and senior author of the paper.


Netizen Report: Internet Censorship Bills Loom Large Over Egypt, South Africa

Slate

Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University that examines emerging technologies, public policy, and society. The Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in internet rights around the world. It originally appears each week on Global Voices Advocacy. Egyptian parliamentarians will soon review a draft anti-cybercrime law that could codify internet censorship practices into national law. While the Egyptian government is notorious for censoring websites and platforms on national security grounds, there are no laws in force that explicitly dictate what is and is not permissible in online censorship.