BigData in HealthCare TLV April 16, 2019, Wohl Center, Tel Aviv

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"I am delighted to invite you to participate in the first Big DataTLV event in Israel to focus on HealthCare.The event takes place on April 16, 2019, in the Wohl Convention Center in the heart of Innovation Nation, Israel."


SAPVoice: How To Improve Precision Medicine with Machine Learning

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Machine learning can be the difference between life and death. The technology, which enables computers teach themselves, is about more than who has the world's biggest AI platform -- or how well a platform evaluates cookie recipes; it could be a tremendous boon for precision medicine, which tailors healthcare to the specifics of individual patients. An individual patient's genome is a massive DNA dataset that has already helped physicians tailor treatment to thousands of patients. Using precision medicine for cancer treatment, for example, involves identifying characteristics that could help predict a specific treatment's effectiveness for a specific patient, OncLive stated on Tuesday. Legacy methods might have based treatment on the cancer's stage, which is a relatively limited indicator of success.


SAPVoice: How To Improve Precision Medicine with Machine Learning

#artificialintelligence

Machine learning can be the difference between life and death. The technology, which enables computers teach themselves, is about more than who has the world's biggest AI platform -- or how well a platform evaluates cookie recipes; it could be a tremendous boon for precision medicine, which tailors healthcare to the specifics of individual patients. An individual patient's genome is a massive DNA dataset that has already helped physicians tailor treatment to thousands of patients. Using precision medicine for cancer treatment, for example, involves identifying characteristics that could help predict a specific treatment's effectiveness for a specific patient, OncLive stated on Tuesday. Legacy methods might have based treatment on the cancer's stage, which is a relatively limited indicator of success.


A Healthy Future for Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

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One of the hottest tech trends these days is artificial intelligence (AI), with researchers looking into the use of AI for applications ranging from autonomous vehicles to financial management, to healthcare. The healthcare industry is often at the forefront of innovation and technological advances due to the wealth of medical devices, equipment and processes that permeate the industry. But AI in particular seems poised to transform the way we collect, understand and use data on patient health, healthcare services and historical health data to revolutionize medical diagnostics, treatment and research. What makes AI so suitable for use in medical research and the healthcare industry? Largely, the appeal of AI is its ability to collect, analyze and make sense of vast amounts of unstructured and variable data--especially text, statistical numbers, and visual images--quickly and often more accurately than a human being.


Healthcare in Israel - Wikipedia

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Healthcare in Israel is universal and participation in a medical insurance plan is compulsory. All Israeli residents are entitled to basic health care as a fundamental right. The Israeli healthcare system is based on the National Health Insurance Law of 1995, which mandates all citizens resident in the country to join one of four official health insurance organizations, known as Kupat Holim (קופת חולים - "Sick Funds") which are run as not-for-profit organizations and are prohibited by law from denying any Israeli resident membership. Israelis can increase their medical coverage and improve their options by purchasing private health insurance.[1] In a survey of 48 countries in 2013, Israel's health system was ranked fourth in the world in terms of efficiency, and in 2014 it ranked seventh out of 51.[2] In 2015, Israel was ranked sixth-healthiest country in the world by Bloomberg rankings[3] and ranked eighth in terms of life expectancy. During the Ottoman era, health care in the region of Palestine was poor and underdeveloped. Most medical institutions were run by Christian missionaries, who attracted the indigent by offering free care. In the late nineteenth century, as the Yishuv, the pre-state Jewish community, began to grow in the wake of the First Aliyah, the Jews attempted to establish their own medical system. In 1872, Max Sandreczky, a German Christian physician, settled in Jerusalem and opened the first children's hospital in the country, Marienstift, which admitted children of all faiths.[4] The Jewish agricultural settlements, financially backed by Baron Edmond de Rothschild, hired a physician who traveled between the communities and ran a pharmacy in Jaffa which he visited twice a week.[5]