Genetically-modified wheat used to make coeliac-friendly bread

New Scientist

People forced to avoid gluten could soon have their bread (and cake) and eat it. Now there are strains of wheat that do not produce the forms of gluten that trigger a dangerous immune reaction in as many as 1 in 100 people. Because the new strains still contain some kinds of gluten, though, the wheat can still be used to bake bread. "It's regarded as being pretty good, certainly better than anything on the gluten-free shelves," says Jan Chojecki of PBL-Ventures in the UK, who is working with investors in North America to market products made with this wheat. Gluten is the general term for all the proteins in wheat and related cereals.


Editing 'bad' gluten out of wheat makes it safer for coeliacs

New Scientist

PEOPLE forced to avoid gluten could soon have their bread (and cake) and eat it. Now there are strains of wheat that do not produce the forms of gluten that trigger a dangerous immune reaction in as many as 1 in 100 people. Because the new strains still contain some kinds of gluten, though, the wheat can still be used to bake bread. "It's regarded as being pretty good, certainly better than anything on the gluten-free shelves," says Jan Chojecki of PBL-Ventures in the UK, who is working with investors in North America to market products made with this wheat. Gluten is the general term for all the proteins in wheat and related cereals.


Would 'good gluten' foods work for people who eat gluten-free?

New Scientist

A team in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the "bad glutens" that trigger the autoimmune disorder coeliac disease. But breads, cakes and pastas made from these strains might also appeal to people with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, and those who think gluten-free diets are healthier. A small trial in 20 people with "gluten sensitivity" has shown that they can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says Francisco Barro, at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, who is creating the new strains. However, the results from this tiny trial have not been published yet. What's more, Barro acknowledges that the idea that some people cannot tolerate gluten is controversial.


Gary Marcus: Toward a Hybrid of Deep Learning and Symbolic AI Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

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Gary Marcus is a professor emeritus at NYU, founder of Robust.AI and Geometric Intelligence, the latter is a machine learning company acquired by Uber in 2016. He is the author of several books on natural and artificial intelligence, including his new book Rebooting AI: Building Machines We Can Trust. Gary has been a critical voice highlighting the limits of deep learning and discussing the challenges before the AI community that must be solved in order to achieve artificial general intelligence. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.


Gilbert Strang: Linear Algebra, Deep Learning, Teaching, and MIT OpenCourseWare AI Podcast

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Gilbert Strang is a professor of mathematics at MIT and perhaps one of the most famous and impactful teachers of math in the world. His MIT OpenCourseWare lectures on linear algebra have been viewed millions of times. This conversation is part of the Artificial Intelligence podcast.