The Age of AI Will Force Us to Rethink Work, Love and Humanity

#artificialintelligence

Most of the attention on the relationship between the U.S. and China is about whether or not there will be a trade war, and, more generally, about how each country is trying to displace the other in a zero-sum game to be the world's dominant superpower. But the more important consequence of that relationship is how the two countries have created a duopoly -- as the dominant powers in AI -- which is going to change the world much more dramatically than any trade war has the potential to. It's one of those books you read and think, "Why are people reading any other book right now when this is so clearly the one they need to be reading?" His thesis -- urgent but hopeful -- goes something like this: Work on artificial intelligence has been going on since the 1950s. But in the last 5 or so years, advances have accelerated in deep learning, or what Kai-Fu Lee calls "narrow AI" technology, which can digest huge amounts of data from one particular domain and make decisions much more effectively or accurately than a human can.


Facial and emotional recognition; how one man is advancing artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Despite what you hear about artificial intelligence, machines still can't think like a human, but in the last few years they have become capable of learning. And suddenly, our devices have opened their eyes and ears and cars have taken the wheel. Today, artificial intelligence is not as good as you hope and not as bad as you fear, but humanity is accelerating into a future that few can predict. That's why so many people are desperate to meet Kai-Fu Lee, the oracle of AI. Kai-Fu Lee is in there, somewhere, in a selfie scrum at a Beijing Internet Conference.


Facial and emotional recognition; how one man is advancing artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Despite what you hear about artificial intelligence, machines still can't think like a human, but in the last few years they have become capable of learning. And suddenly, our devices have opened their eyes and ears and cars have taken the wheel. Today, artificial intelligence is not as good as you hope and not as bad as you fear, but humanity is accelerating into a future that few can predict. That's why so many people are desperate to meet Kai-Fu Lee, the oracle of AI. Kai-Fu Lee is in there, somewhere, in a selfie scrum at a Beijing Internet Conference.


10 Books on AI Machine Learning You Shouldn't Miss Reading

#artificialintelligence

"If you program a machine, you know what it's capable of. If the machine is programming itself, who knows what it might do?" ― Garry Kasparov Artificial Intelligence is a complex subject. However, reading and acquiring knowledge through books written on Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Data Science and other related topics can help technology enthusiasts to a great extent. Here is a list of ten books on AI and Machine Learning that provide the information on basics of technology, its present, the future paradigm and the most rabid fictionalized set-ups that are expected to arrive in the coming future. We have rated the books on a scale of 1-5, considering their depth, research, uniqueness, reader's review, and the AiThority News Quotient.


AI Superpowers By Kai-Fu Lee Defines A New World Order For Silicon Valley, China

Forbes - Tech

I've been reading a new book by AI expert Kai-Fu Lee with great interest. The book, AI Superpowers, which is due out this September, underscores a race between China and the U.S. for AI's development. It delves into the tech innovation upgrade and entrepreneurial energy that are leading China to catch up to the U.S. leadership position in AI at an astonishingly rapid rate. This insightful book by Lee who is both an AI pioneer and a China venture capitalist as head of tech-savvy Sinovation Ventures in Beijing, lays out how China is set to dominate the AI era due to having more data. It's a wake-up call for Silicon Valley, a message I understand well as the author of Silicon Dragon, published a decade ago when most Sand Hill Road VCs did not want to hear that the Chinese are coming.