Goto

Collaborating Authors


Google spinoff Waymo has built its own self-driving sensors

Washington Post - Technology News

Google's autonomous driving spinoff, Waymo, has developed sensors that pair with its self-driving software, potentially opening the door for the company to sell a comprehensive system that automakers build into future car models. Google initially built its self-driving software on a prototype car outfitted with sensors, cameras and other hardware from outside suppliers. But to build a more affordable and sophisticated system capable of fully autonomous driving, the company decided it needed to create both halves of the technology, executives said. The announcement comes just weeks after Japanese automaker Honda said it would incorporate Waymo's technology into some of its vehicles. The companies said that deal was centered on research rather than producing vehicles for market, Bloomberg News reported.


Will Thermal Sensors Create A Self-Driving Breakthrough?

#artificialintelligence

For anyone questioning the strides being made in the world of autonomous vehicles, meet FLIR Systems. The California tech company has been developing its thermal sensor camera technology to enhance capabilities of self-driving cars. FLIR has been developing thermal sensor technology that could impact the future of self-driving vehicles. Ride actually had an opportunity to experience FLIR's thermal technology during a demo ride at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show. Widely known for its military applications, thermal sensors focus on heat emanating from objects, which makes the technology more efficient in detecting obstacles on the road across various depths of field.


Luminar reveals sensors that could make self-driving cars safer than human

#artificialintelligence

Cameras help autonomous vehicles read street signs and the color of traffic lights. But LiDARs, aka light detection and ranging systems, do the important work of sensing and helping cars avoid obstacles, whether that's a fallen tree, drunk driver, or a child running out into the road. Now, a startup called Luminar Technologies Inc., is unveiling a high-resolution LiDAR sensor that was five years in the making. The startup, which has raised $36 million in seed-stage funding so far, built its LiDAR systems from scratch. That means the company engineered its own: lasers, receivers, chips, packaging and more, rather than incorporating off-the-shelf components.


Luminar reveals sensors that could make self-driving cars safer than human

#artificialintelligence

Cameras help autonomous vehicles read street signs and the color of traffic lights. But LiDARs, aka light detection and ranging systems, do the important work of sensing and helping cars avoid obstacles, whether that's a fallen tree, drunk driver, or a child running out into the road. Now, a startup called Luminar Technologies Inc., is unveiling a high-resolution LiDAR sensor that was five years in the making. The startup, which has raised $36 million in seed-stage funding so far, built its LiDAR systems from scratch. That means the company engineered its own: lasers, receivers, chips, packaging and more, rather than incorporating off-the-shelf components.