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Tinder Age Discrimination Lawsuit: Court Sides With Men's Rights Activist

International Business Times

A United States appeals court in California has ruled against Tinder in a case that charges the popular dating service has been discriminating against older users by charging a higher price for premium features.



Is Tinder Plus' Age-Based Pricing a Discount for the Young or a Surcharge for People Over 30?

Slate

Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University that examines emerging technologies, public policy, and society.


Tinder slammed over mysterious premium pricing, transparency and data use concerns

Mashable

Tinder users have known for a while that the price you pay for the dating app's premium service, Tinder Plus, might not be the same amount the people you're swiping are shelling out. Tinder has already settled an age discrimination lawsuit in California, which saw users over 29 in the state -- who, like all U.S. users, had been paying double what younger people were for the subscription -- eligible for part of a settlement totalling $23 million. Now the Australian consumer organisation Choice has filed an official complaint with the national consumer commission, the ACCC, after conducting a mystery-shopper survey that found prices for a one-month subscription to Tinder Plus ranged from AUD$6.99 to more than AUD$34, with no transparency upfront about the variation. Tinder Plus is the lowest tier of Tinder's premium subscription options, offering users extra features like unlimited swipes, the ability to undo left-swipes, and Super Likes and Boosts to help get your profile more attention. There's also Tinder Gold, which includes all the above as well as the ability to see who's already swiped right on you and Top Picks, and the new Platinum tier, which includes the ability to message people you haven't actually matched with yet.


Tinder settles lawsuit over age discrimination

Engadget

Mature romantics just caught a break. Tinder has settled a lawsuit accusing it of age discrimination for charging the 30-and-up crowd double to subscribe to its premium Tinder Plus service. The Match Group-owned brand will pay $17.25 million in cash and in-app features (such as $25 checks, Super Likes and Plus/Gold subscriptions) to users who had to pay $20 per month instead of the $10 offered to younger customers. Tinder will also have to stop charging general age-based rates in California, although it will have the option of discounting service for people 21 or younger. The woman behind the lawsuit, Lisa Kim, will also receive $5,000.