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Medical delivery drones are coming to Switzerland

Mashable

Next month, Switzerland's hospitals will be equipped with a potentially revolutionary autonomous drone delivery network. Healthcare providers and a Menlo Park, California company called Matternet have teamed up to implement the system across the country. And on Wednesday, Matternet announced that they had completed "the third and final technology component" to make their drone and information system a reality. It's called the Matternet Station: a two square foot robotic drone loading dock and smart launching and landing pad that enables hospitals to quickly send and receive crucial medical samples and resources, all by drone.


Autonomous delivery drone network set to take flight in Switzerland

Engadget

Matternet has long used Switzerland as a testing ground for its delivery drone technology, and now it's ramping things up a notch. The company has revealed plans to launch the first permanent autonomous drone delivery network in Switzerland, where its flying robot couriers will shuttle blood and pathology samples between hospital facilities. The trick is the Matternet Station you see above: when a drone lands, the Station locks it into place and swaps out both the battery and the cargo (loaded into boxes by humans, who scan QR codes for access). Stations even have their own mechanisms to manage drone traffic if the skies are busy. And the automation isn't just for the sake of cleverness -- it might be crucial to saving lives.


Switzerland's Getting a Delivery Network for Blood-Toting Drones

WIRED

If you're interested in drone deliveries, it's likely because you want your internet shopping dropped at your door within an hour of clicking "buy." And while companies like Amazon are working to make that happen, complicated logistics and thorny regulations mean it's likely to be years before you start hearing the whir of rotors on your front porch. Yet drones are already proving their worth with more urgent, medical, missions. The latest of these comes from Silicon Valley startup Matternet, which has been testing an autonomous drone network over Switzerland, shuttling blood and other medical samples between hospitals and testing facilities. "We have a vision of a distributed network, not hub and spoke, but true peer-to-peer," says Matternet CEO Andreas Raptopoulos.


Delivery by drone: Switzerland tests it in populated areas

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Coffee has been delivered by drone for the first time ever in a densely populated area. The test was part of a project in Zurich to deliver household items such as toothbrushes, deodorant and smartphones to Swiss homes by unmanned aerial devices this autumn. Big firms such as Amazon and Google have spent several years investing in drone delivery research, seeing it as the future of goods distribution. The test was part of a project in Zurich to deliver household items such as toothbrushes, deodorant and smartphones to Swiss homes by unmanned aerial devices this autumn. The experiment come as big firms such as Amazon and Google have spent several years investing in drone delivery research.


The future of the delivery van: Mercedes concept comes complete with robot shelves and drone parking on the roof to deliver to the door

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Mercedes-Benz has transformed a van into a mobile distribution center - complete with drone parking. Teaming up with drone startup Matternet, the concept'Vision Van' acts as a landing and launch pad for Matternet M2 delivery drones that can carry up to 4.4 pounds for 12 miles on a single charge. These drones connect to Mercedes-Benz van's on-board and cloud-based systems that automatically loads items into the drone with the help of robotic shelving systems. Mercedes-Benz has transformed a van into a mobile distribution center. Teaming up with drone startup Matternet, the concept'Vision Van' acts as a landing and launch pad for Matternet M2 delivery drones that can carry up to 4.4 pounds for 12 miles on a single charge Using software and robots, packages are scanned, sorted and placed in specific racks, which are then loaded on to the truck with a driverless handling vehicle.