AI could predict cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease in the next five years: Algorithms may help doctors stream people onto prevention path sooner

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Dr. Mallar Chakravarty, a computational neuroscientist at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, and his colleagues from the University of Toronto and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, designed an algorithm that learns signatures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetics, and clinical data. This specific algorithm can help predict whether an individual's cognitive faculties are likely to deteriorate towards Alzheimer's in the next five years. "At the moment, there are limited ways to treat Alzheimer's and the best evidence we have is for prevention. Our AI methodology could have significant implications as a'doctor's assistant' that would help stream people onto the right pathway for treatment. For example, one could even initiate lifestyle changes that may delay the beginning stages of Alzheimer's or even prevent it altogether," says Chakravarty, an Assistant Professor in McGill University's Department of Psychiatry.


AI Could Predict Cognitive Decline Leading to Alzheimer's Disease in the Next 5 Years

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A team of scientists has successfully trained a new artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm to make accurate predictions regarding cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Mallar Chakravarty, a computational neuroscientist at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, and his colleagues from the University of Toronto and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, designed an algorithm that learns signatures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetics, and clinical data. This specific algorithm can help predict whether an individual's cognitive faculties are likely to deteriorate towards Alzheimer's in the next five years. "At the moment, there are limited ways to treat Alzheimer's and the best evidence we have is for prevention. Our AI methodology could have significant implications as a'doctor's assistant' that would help stream people onto the right pathway for treatment. For example, one could even initiate lifestyle changes that may delay the beginning stages of Alzheimer's or even prevent it altogether," says Chakravarty, an Assistant Professor in McGill University's Department of Psychiatry.


How AI Can Help Identify the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

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Ongoing research initiatives are showing that artificial intelligence may be able to predict a person's likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease with a high level of accuracy. As the population ages, the specter of Alzheimer's disease becomes all the more ominous. It's like a dark cloud on the horizon, threatening a massive and devastating storm that is coming our way. In reality, this storm has already begun. Today, 5.8 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's, according to the Alzheimer's Association.


New AI tool can predict Alzheimer's risk

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Toronto: A team of scientists, including one of an Indian-origin, has successfully trained a new Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithm that may soon help doctors to make accurate predictions regarding cognitive decline leading to Alzheimer's disease and provide intervention. The team, from the McGill University in Canada, designed an algorithm that learns signatures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), genetics, and clinical data. This specific algorithm can help predict whether an individual's cognitive faculties are likely to deteriorate towards Alzheimer's in the next five years. "At the moment, there are limited ways to treat Alzheimer's and the best evidence we have is for prevention. Our AI methodology could have significant implications as a'doctor's assistant' that would help stream people onto the right pathway for treatment," Mallar Chakravarty, assistant professor at the University's Department of Psychiatry.


AI – Spotting Changes in the Brain Years Before Alzheimer's Symptoms Emerge

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Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) is challenging, time consuming, and costly. Currently, there is no single test, or series of tests, that can determine with 100% certainty whether an individual has developed AD. In fact, AD cannot be definitively diagnosed until after death, when the brain can be closely examined for certain microscopic changes caused by the disease. When an individual reports to a doctor that he or she has experienced bouts of memory loss or decreased cognitive function, he or she may be assessed using a variety of cognitive and physical tests, some quite invasive, to determine whether he or she "probably" has AD. However, this diagnosis requires visible symptoms that may only show up when it is too late to start preventative measures.