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AI's Latest Breakthrough Will Transform Learning--Here Are 5 Ways

#artificialintelligence

The Fourth Industrial Revolution just took a huge step forward, thanks to a breakthrough artificial intelligence (AI) model that can learn virtually anything about the world -- and produce the content to tell us about it. The AI program is GPT-3 by OpenAI, which started out as a language model to predict the next word in a sentence and has vastly exceeded that capability. Now, drawing from voluminous data -- essentially all of Wikipedia, links from Reddit, and other Internet content -- GPT-3 has shown it can also compose text that is virtually indistinguishable from human-generated content. Asger Alstrup Palm, Area9's chief technology officer, explained that GPT-3 was tasked with testing the "scaling hypothesis" -- to see if a bigger model with ever-increasing amounts of information would lead to better performance. Although it's too early to call the scaling hypothesis proven, there are some strong indications that this is, indeed, the case. Further validating the potential of GPT-3, Microsoft recently announced it will exclusively license the model from OpenAI, with the intention of developing and delivering AI solutions for customers and creating new solutions using natural language generation.


In the AI era, universities need to strengthen students' creativity

#artificialintelligence

Advances in artificial intelligence in the early 2010s, particularly in deep learning, triggered a new wave of panic and fear about technological unemployment. Further intensifying those fears were a host of sensational articles about the magical capabilities of AI algorithms and ambiguous statements by company executives creating the impression that human-level AI is just around the corner. But the past few years have only highlighted the limits of current AI technologies. At the turn of the decade, as the world locked down to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, we got to see whether the promises of artificial intelligence and robots replacing humans would materialize. But while AI isn't ready to replace humans, there's no denying that it will change the employment landscape, including areas that were previously considered to be off-limits for technology and automation.



How education must adapt to artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to AI book reviews, a series of posts that explore the latest literature on artificial intelligence. Advances in artificial intelligence in the early 2010s, particularly in deep learning, triggered a new wave of panic and fear about technological unemployment. Further intensifying those fears were a host of sensational articles about the magical capabilities of AI algorithms and ambiguous statements by company executives creating the impression that human-level AI is just around the corner. But the past few years have only highlighted the limits of current AI technologies. At the turn of the decade, as the world locked down to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, we got to see whether the promises of artificial intelligence and robots replacing humans would materialize.


AI Grand Challenges for Education

AI Magazine

This article focuses on contributions that AI can make to address longterm educational goals. Challenges are described that support: (1) mentors for every learner; (2) learning 21st century skills; (3) interaction data for learning; (4) universal access to global classrooms; and (5) lifelong and lifewide learning. A vision and brief research agenda are described for each challenge along with goals that lead to development of global educational resources and the reuse and sharing of digital educational resources. Instructional systems with AI technology are described that currently support richer experiences for learners and supply researchers with new opportunities to analyze vast data sets of instructional behavior from big databases that record elements of learning, affect, motivation, and social interaction. Personalized learning is described that facilitates student and group experience, reflection, and assessment.