Facial Recognition Tech Is Creepy When It Works--And Creepier When It Doesn't

WIRED

For the last few years, police forces around China have invested heavily to build the world's largest video surveillance and facial recognition system, incorporating more than 170 million cameras so far. In a December test of the dragnet in Guiyang, a city of 4.3 million people in southwest China, a BBC reporter was flagged for arrest within seven minutes of police adding his headshot to a facial recognition database. And in the southeast city of Nanchang, Chinese police say that last month they arrested a suspect wanted for "economic crimes" after a facial recognition system spotted him at a pop concert amidst 60,000 other attendees. These types of stories, combined with reports that computer vision recognizes some types of images more accurately than humans, makes it seem like the Panopticon has officially arrived. In the US alone, 117 million Americans, or roughly one in two US adults, have their picture in a law enforcement facial-recognition database.


A Direct Evolutionary Feature Extraction Algorithm for Classifying High Dimensional Data

AAAI Conferences

Among various feature extraction algorithms, those based on genetic algorithms are promising owing to their potential parallelizability and possible applications in large scale and high dimensional data classification. However, existing genetic algorithm based feature extraction algorithms are either limited in searching optimal projection basis vectors or costly in both time and space complexities and thus not directly applicable to high dimensional data. In this paper, a direct evolutionary feature extraction algorithm is proposed for classifying high-dimensional data. It constructs projection basis vectors using the linear combination of the basis of the search space and the technique of orthogonal complement. It also constrains the search space when seeking for the optimal projection basis vectors. It evaluates individuals according to the classification performance on a subset of the training samples and the generalization ability of the projection basis vectors represented by the individuals. We compared the proposed algorithm with some representative feature extraction algorithms in face recognition, including the evolutionary pursuit algorithm, Eigenfaces, and Fisherfaces. The results on the widely-used Yale and ORL face databases show that the proposed algorithm has an excellent performance in classification while reducing the space complexity by an order of magnitude.


DENSO and Toshiba Agree to Develop Artificial Intelligence Technology, Deep Neural Network-IP, for Next-generation Image Recognition Systems

#artificialintelligence

KARIYA, Japan & TOKYO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DENSO Corporation and Toshiba Corporation have reached a basic agreement to jointly develop an artificial intelligence technology called Deep Neural Network-Intellectual Property (DNN-IP), which will be used in image recognition systems which have been independently developed by the two companies to help achieve advanced driver assistance and automated driving technologies. DNN, an algorithm modeled after the neural networks of the human brain, is expected to perform recognition processing as accurately as, or even better than the human brain. To achieve automated driving, automotive computers need to be able to identify different road traffic situations including a variety of obstacles and road markings, availability of road space for driving, and potentially dangerous situations. In image recognition based on conventional pattern recognition and machine learning, objects that need to be recognized by computers must be characterized and extracted in advance. In DNN-based image recognition, computers can extract and learn the characteristics of objects on their own, thus significantly improving the accuracy of detection and identification of a wide range of objects.


New iPhone to improve facial recognition feature so it can see owner better, report claims

The Independent

Apple's next iPhone could bring important updates to its flagship feature, according to a new rumour. The phone could vastly improve the Face ID facial recognition that sits in the top of the handset. New technology will allow the invisible lights that are used as part of the system to illuminate people's face far better, allowing it to recognise its owners more quickly, according to a report from reliable Apple analyst Ming-chi Kuo. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Facial recognition technology: What would George Orwell say?

The Japan Times

This coming June, British author George Orwell's dystopian novel, "Nineteen Eighty-Four," marks the 70th anniversary of its publication. In the United States, Penguin has announced plans for a special 75,000-copy reprint. According to The New York Times, the publisher noted that, sales of the novel have increased by 9,500 percent since the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump. Demonstrating remarkable foresight, Orwell envisaged a terrifying future in which a "Big Brother" government would harness tools to watch each and every one of us. When Winston Smith, the book's protagonist, wanted to meet his illicit lover, he was forced to take extreme measures to avoid a two-way device called a "telescreen," described as follows: "The telescreen received and transmitted simultaneously. Any sound that Winston made, above the level of a very low whisper, would be picked up by it, moreover, so long as he remained within the field of vision which the metal plaque commanded, he could be seen as well as heard."