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Earthquake video shows how the ground turns to liquid

Daily Mail - Science & tech

We often think of earthquakes by imagining violent tremors and cracks in the ground. But one of the most damaging impacts of an quake is liquefaction - a phenomenon where the ground turns to soup and sucks in cars, roads and even buildings. To help people understand the little-known process, scientists from Illinois State University have created an alarming video demonstrating how sand can turn to liquid when it is put under stress. Liquefaction is a deadly natural phenomenon that occurs during an earthquake. When the land is in its normal formation, the grains of sand and soil stack on top of one another in layers to create a firm structure held together by friction.


Why is This Road in Mexico 'Breathing'?

National Geographic

As Mexico reels from the destruction of a recent earthquake, a strange phenomenon has surfaced on its streets. The phenomenon was spotted by resident Rigoberto Lechuga Silva on Sept. 19, just as the earthquake tremors rippled through his neighborhood. He noticed a lamp post wobbling and took out his phone to record the movement when he spotted the concrete rising and falling. After Silva posted his video on YouTube, it was quickly copied and shared on various social media platforms. On Twitter, scientists who viewed the clip began chiming in with theories for what could be causing the concrete to buckle.


Digger driver prods the earth with his bucket and it ripples like water

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This is the bizarre moment the ground beneath a digger wobbles and ripples like a giant waterbed. In the video, which was filmed by the operator of a digger in Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada, a large area of sand can be seen moving like waves. The construction worker appears to tempt fate by prodding the unstable surface with the bucket of the digger. The rippling of the sand is believed to be caused by a phenomenon called soil liquefaction. This is when the ground is saturated with water and then becomes stressed from a sudden movement such as the shaking from an earthquake - or the bucket of a digger.


Digger driver prods the earth with his bucket and it ripples like water

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This is the bizarre moment the ground beneath a digger wobbles and ripples like a giant waterbed. In the video, which was filmed by the operator of a digger in Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada, a large area of sand can be seen moving like waves. The construction worker appears to tempt fate by prodding the unstable surface with the bucket of the digger. The rippling of the sand is believed to be caused by a phenomenon called soil liquefaction. This is when the ground is saturated with water and then becomes stressed from a sudden movement such as the shaking from an earthquake - or the bucket of a digger.


Indonesia expert warned of quake and government mapped risk areas

The Japan Times

PETOBO, INDONESIA – When the violent shaking from a massive magnitude 7.5 earthquake finally stopped, Selvi Susanti stood up and realized something strange was happening. First, she saw the ground suddenly begin to sink. Then the pavement split beneath her feet like a broken dinner plate and started to rise. Terrified, she clung to a small sliver of asphalt and surfed a river of fast-moving mud as it swallowed entire neighborhoods, carrying her higher than coconut trees for a quarter of a mile. "What I saw -- oh my God! Houses were tumbling.