Organizations Deploying Artificial Intelligence Are Creating Jobs and Increasing Sales Press release

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New research from Capgemini's Digital Transformation Institute shows that four out of five companies implementing AI have created new jobs as a result of AI technology Paris, September 7, 2017 – Capgemini, a global leader in consulting, technology and outsourcing services, has today announced the findings of "Turning AI into concrete value: the successful implementers' toolkit", a study of nearly 1,000 organizations with revenues of more than $500m that are implementing artificial intelligence (AI), either as a pilot or at scale[1]. The research both counters fears that AI will cause massive job losses in the short term, as 83% of firms surveyed say AI has generated new roles in their organizations, and highlights the growth opportunity presented by AI: three-quarters of firms have seen a 10% uplift in sales, directly tied to AI implementation. The report, which surveyed executives from nine countries and across seven sectors, found that four out of five companies (83%) have created new jobs as a result of AI technology. Specifically, organizations are producing jobs at a senior level, with two in three jobs being created at the grade of a manager or above. Furthermore, among organizations that have implemented AI at scale, more than 3 in 5 (63%) said that AI has not destroyed any jobs in their organization.


CAP GEMINI : Capgemini study: Organizations shifting analytics 'focus' away from customer experience towards operations 4-Traders

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'Organizations are pivoting towards operational analytics as it can both increase the efficiency and performance of the back office as well as boost the customer experience in the front office.' comments Anne-Laure Thieullent, Head of Big Data in Europe, for Capgemini's Insights & Data global practice. 'However, despite the focus, there are factors limiting the success of these projects; specifically siloed datasets, fragile governance models, inability to harness third party data sources, and an absence of a strong mandate from leadership teams.' 'Going Big: Why Organizations Need to Focus on Operations Analytics' from Capgemini Consulting's Digital Transformation Institute mapped organizations based on the extent to which their analytics initiatives were integrated with core operations processes and their success rate with initiatives, identifying four stages of operational analytics maturity: Capgemini Consulting's Digital Transformation Institute applied the four stages of operational analytics maturity to build up a geographic picture of adoption and success rates around the world. US companies are not only the most advanced with their analytics initiatives but also the most successful; 50 percent have successfully realized the desired benefits from operational analytics compared to only 23 percent of Chinese respondents, despite China ranking highly for level of implementation. A strong contributing factor of the success of US companies is their focus on setting up effective data and governance processes. The prominence of US organizations tallies with a recent resurgence in US manufacturing and will drive US manufacturing competitiveness in the coming years.


69 PC of Organizations Unable to Tackle Cybersecurity Threats Without AI

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Businesses are increasing the pace of investment in AI systems to defend against the next generation of cyberattacks, a new study from the Capgemini Research Institute has found. Two thirds (69%) of organizations acknowledge that they will not be able to respond to critical threats without AI. With the number of end-user devices, networks, and user interfaces growing as a result of advances in the cloud, IoT, 5G and conversational interface technologies, organizations face an urgent need to continually ramp up and improve their cybersecurity. AI-enabled cybersecurity is now an imperative: Over half (56%) of executives say their cybersecurity analysts are overwhelmed by the vast array of data points they need to monitor to detect and prevent intrusion. Accordingly, almost half (48%) said that budgets for AI in cybersecurity will increase in FY2020 by nearly a third (29%).


Artificial Intelligence In Automotive Industry: Surprisingly Slow Uptake And Missed Opportunities

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The automotive industry is one of the most high-tech industries in the world – so a headline finding in a report published this week was, on the face of it, somewhat surprising. Capgemini's report – Accelerating Automotive's AI Transformation – found that during 2018, the number of companies in the industry deploying AI "at scale" grew only marginally by 3%. This reflected that just 10% of respondents surveyed said that their organizations were deploying AI-driven initiatives across the entirety of its operations "with full scope and scale," during 2018, compared to 7% in 2017. The relatively slow pace of growth is evidence that "the industry has not made significant progress in AI-driven transformation since 2017", the report concludes – a surprising finding given the scale of investment and enthusiasm shown by industry leaders. I spoke to one of the report's authors, Capgemini's Ingo Finck, who told me "To an extent, I did find this surprising, because from the discussions we've been having with these companies we see that the vast majority – more than 80% - mention AI in their core strategy. "It's clearly a strategic factor for them, so yes … we were surprised by the relatively slow growth rate." Before we start delving into the possible reasons for this slow uptake, it's worth noting that there is a key geographic variation: In China, the number of automotive companies working at scale with AI almost doubled, from 5% to 9%. This is explained to some extent by the comparatively "open" approach taken by China's AI giants, such as Baidu's development of the open source Apollo platform. This has involved it partnering with over 130 other businesses and organizations. Finck explains that the slow growth demonstrated in other regions could be down to the fact that organizations are taking a more mature approach to AI deployment. This might mean they are moving away from "try everything and see what works" methodologies, towards focusing on proven use cases that can then be scaled. Another disparity is apparent when we consider the sizes of the businesses that are reporting growth in AI deployments. "We can see that the smaller companies are struggling more with AI – whereas with larger companies [with revenue of $10 billion plus] the adoption rate is higher.


Organizations must address ethics in AI to gain public's trust and loyalty

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Paris, July 5, 2019 – The ethical use of AI is becoming fundamental to winning people's trust, a new study from the Capgemini Research Institute has found. As organizations progress to harness the benefits of AI, consumers, employees and citizens are watching closely and are ready to reward or punish behavior. Those surveyed said that they would be more loyal to, purchase more from, or be an advocate for organizations whose AI interactions are deemed ethical. Companies using AI in an ethical way will be rewarded: Among consumers surveyed, 62% said they would place higher trust in a company whose AI interactions they perceived as ethical, 61% said they would share positive experiences with friends and family, 59% said that they would have higher loyalty to the company, and 55% said that they would purchase more products and provide high ratings and positive feedback on social media. By contrast, when consumers' AI interactions result in ethical issues, it threatens both reputation and the bottom line: 41% said they would complain in case an AI interaction resulted in ethical issues, 36% would demand an explanation and 34% would stop interacting with the company.