Goto

Collaborating Authors

The Secret Sharer: Measuring Unintended Neural Network Memorization & Extracting Secrets

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Machine learning models based on neural networks and deep learning are being rapidly adopted for many purposes. What those models learn, and what they may share, is a significant concern when the training data may contain secrets and the models are public -- e.g., when a model helps users compose text messages using models trained on all users' messages. This paper presents exposure: a simple-to-compute metric that can be applied to any deep learning model for measuring the memorization of secrets. Using this metric, we show how to extract those secrets efficiently using black-box API access. Further, we show that unintended memorization occurs early, is not due to over-fitting, and is a persistent issue across different types of models, hyperparameters, and training strategies. We experiment with both real-world models (e.g., a state-of-the-art translation model) and datasets (e.g., the Enron email dataset, which contains users' credit card numbers) to demonstrate both the utility of measuring exposure and the ability to extract secrets. Finally, we consider many defenses, finding some ineffective (like regularization), and others to lack guarantees. However, by instantiating our own differentially-private recurrent model, we validate that by appropriately investing in the use of state-of-the-art techniques, the problem can be resolved, with high utility.


Introducing TensorFlow Privacy: Learning with Differential Privacy for Training Data

#artificialintelligence

Today, we're excited to announce TensorFlow Privacy (GitHub), an open source library that makes it easier not only for developers to train machine-learning models with privacy, but also for researchers to advance the state of the art in machine learning with strong privacy guarantees. Modern machine learning is increasingly applied to create amazing new technologies and user experiences, many of which involve training machines to learn responsibly from sensitive data, such as personal photos or email. Ideally, the parameters of trained machine-learning models should encode general patterns rather than facts about specific training examples. To ensure this, and to give strong privacy guarantees when the training data is sensitive, it is possible to use techniques based on the theory of differential privacy. In particular, when training on users' data, those techniques offer strong mathematical guarantees that models do not learn or remember the details about any specific user.


Learn to Forget: User-Level Memorization Elimination in Federated Learning

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Federated learning is a decentralized machine learning technique that evokes widespread attention in both the research field and the real-world market. However, the current privacy-preserving federated learning scheme only provides a secure way for the users to contribute their private data but never leaves a way to withdraw the contribution to model update. Such an irreversible setting potentially breaks the regulations about data protection and increases the risk of data extraction. To resolve the problem, this paper describes a novel concept for federated learning, called memorization elimination. Based on the concept, we propose \sysname, a federated learning framework that allows the user to eliminate the memorization of its private data in the trained model. Specifically, each user in \sysname is deployed with a trainable dummy gradient generator. After steps of training, the generator can produce dummy gradients to stimulate the neurons of a machine learning model to eliminate the memorization of the specific data. Also, we prove that the additional memorization elimination service of \sysname does not break the common procedure of federated learning or lower its security.


Analyzing Privacy Loss in Updates of Natural Language Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

To continuously improve quality and reflect changes in data, machine learning-based services have to regularly re-train and update their core models. In the setting of language models, we show that a comparative analysis of model snapshots before and after an update can reveal a surprising amount of detailed information about the changes in the data used for training before and after the update. We discuss the privacy implications of our findings, propose mitigation strategies and evaluate their effect.


Three Tools for Practical Differential Privacy

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Differentially private learning on real-world data poses challenges for standard machine learning practice: privacy guarantees are difficult to interpret, hyperparameter tuning on private data reduces the privacy budget, and ad-hoc privacy attacks are often required to test model privacy. We introduce three tools to make differentially private machine learning more practical: (1) simple sanity checks which can be carried out in a centralized manner before training, (2) an adaptive clipping bound to reduce the effective number of tuneable privacy parameters, and (3) we show that large-batch training improves model performance.