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Yes, you can improve your memory. Here's how.

Popular Science

Think back to grade school. Do you remember those standardized tests where you were given lists of meaningless words to memorize? Then, after taking a challenging math or reading section, you had to write down as many words from that list as you could remember? If you were terrible at this, don't fret. Just as you can train yourself to ace the SATs, there's a trick to becoming a master memorizer of random words.


Leveraging Random Label Memorization for Unsupervised Pre-Training

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We present a novel approach to leverage large unlabeled datasets by pre-training state-of-the-art deep neural networks on randomly-labeled datasets. Specifically, we train the neural networks to memorize arbitrary labels for all the samples in a dataset and use these pre-trained networks as a starting point for regular supervised learning. Our assumption is that the "memorization infrastructure" learned by the network during the random-label training proves to be beneficial for the conventional supervised learning as well. We test the effectiveness of our pre-training on several video action recognition datasets (HMDB51, UCF101, Kinetics) by comparing the results of the same network with and without the random label pre-training. Our approach yields an improvement - ranging from 1.5% on UCF-101 to 5% on Kinetics - in classification accuracy, which calls for further research in this direction.


Variance Reduced Stochastic Gradient Descent with Neighbors

Neural Information Processing Systems

Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) is a workhorse in machine learning, yet it is also known to be slow relative to steepest descent. Recently, variance reduction techniques such as SVRG and SAGA have been proposed to overcome this weakness. With asymptotically vanishing variance, a constant step size can be maintained, resulting in geometric convergence rates. However, these methods are either based on occasional computations of full gradients at pivot points (SVRG), or on keeping per data point corrections in memory (SAGA). This has the disadvantage that one cannot employ these methods in a streaming setting and that speed-ups relative to SGD may need a certain number of epochs in order to materialize. This paper investigates a new class of algorithms that can exploit neighborhood structure in the training data to share and re-use information about past stochastic gradients across data points. While not meant to be offering advantages in an asymptotic setting, there are significant benefits in the transient optimization phase, in particular in a streaming or single-epoch setting. We investigate this family of algorithms in a thorough analysis and show supporting experimental results. As a side-product we provide a simple and unified proof technique for a broad class of variance reduction algorithms.


Variance Reduced Stochastic Gradient Descent with Neighbors

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) is a workhorse in machine learning, yet its slow convergence can be a computational bottleneck. Variance reduction techniques such as SAG, SVRG and SAGA have been proposed to overcome this weakness, achieving linear convergence. However, these methods are either based on computations of full gradients at pivot points, or on keeping per data point corrections in memory. Therefore speed-ups relative to SGD may need a minimal number of epochs in order to materialize. This paper investigates algorithms that can exploit neighborhood structure in the training data to share and re-use information about past stochastic gradients across data points, which offers advantages in the transient optimization phase. As a side-product we provide a unified convergence analysis for a family of variance reduction algorithms, which we call memorization algorithms. We provide experimental results supporting our theory.


Nonlinear random matrix theory for deep learning

Neural Information Processing Systems

Neural network configurations with random weights play an important role in the analysis of deep learning. They define the initial loss landscape and are closely related to kernel and random feature methods. Despite the fact that these networks are built out of random matrices, the vast and powerful machinery of random matrix theory has so far found limited success in studying them. A main obstacle in this direction is that neural networks are nonlinear, which prevents the straightforward utilization of many of the existing mathematical results. In this work, we open the door for direct applications of random matrix theory to deep learning by demonstrating that the pointwise nonlinearities typically applied in neural networks can be incorporated into a standard method of proof in random matrix theory known as the moments method. The test case for our study is the Gram matrix $Y^TY$, $Y=f(WX)$, where $W$ is a random weight matrix, $X$ is a random data matrix, and $f$ is a pointwise nonlinear activation function. We derive an explicit representation for the trace of the resolvent of this matrix, which defines its limiting spectral distribution. We apply these results to the computation of the asymptotic performance of single-layer random feature methods on a memorization task and to the analysis of the eigenvalues of the data covariance matrix as it propagates through a neural network. As a byproduct of our analysis, we identify an intriguing new class of activation functions with favorable properties.