Artificial intelligence could 'evolve faster than the human race'

#artificialintelligence

A sinister threat is brewing deep inside the technology laboratories of Silicon Valley, according to Professor Stephen Hawking. Artificial Intelligence, disguised as helpful digital assistants and self-driving vehicles, is gaining a foothold, and it could one day spell the end for mankind. The world-renowned professor has warned robots could evolve faster than humans and their goals will be unpredictable. Professor Stephen Hawking (pictured) claimed AI would be difficult to stop if the appropriate safeguards are not in place. During a talk in Cannes, Google's chairman Eric Schmidt said AI will be developed for the benefit of humanity and there will be systems in place in case anything goes awry.


Google's Eric Schmidt says we should all 'stop freaking out' about AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The doomsday scenario of killer robots taking over the world isn't going to happen. That's according to Google chairman Eric Schmidt, who says we should stop worrying about it and start focusing on the positives. He has said artificial intelligence (AI) will be developed for the benefit of humanity, and although doomsday scenarios should be considered, he is optimistic about the future. Artificial intelligence will let scientists solve some of the world's'hard problems.' 'The original Kodak camera was seen as destroying art,' Mr Schmidt said.


How-train-ROBOT-Artificial-intelligence-end-like-dangerous-dogs-not-controlled-experts-warn.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

Robots are like dogs because, according to some experts, a badly-trained robot could end up misbehaving just like a badly-trained dog. This warning came at a meeting discussing the future of robot and human interactions, held in London this week. But the panel, who emphasised the importance of regulations controlling AI, agreed a doomsday situation in which robots take over is unlikely to happen soon. Robots are like dogs because, according to some experts, a badly-trained robot could end up misbehaving just like a badly-trained dog. Organised by the EPSRC UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems Network (UK-RAS Network), UK Robotics Week included a series of events across the country, aiming to get the public engaged with the developments and debate in and around robotics.


How to train your ROBOT

#artificialintelligence

Robots are like dogs because, according to some experts, a badly-trained robot could end up misbehaving just like a badly-trained dog. This warning came at a meeting discussing the future of robot and human interactions, held in London this week. But the panel, who emphasised the importance of regulations controlling AI, agreed a doomsday situation in which robots take over is unlikely to happen soon. Robots are like dogs because, according to some experts, a badly-trained robot could end up misbehaving just like a badly-trained dog. Organised by the EPSRC UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems Network (UK-RAS Network), UK Robotics Week included a series of events across the country, aiming to get the public engaged with the developments and debate in and around robotics.


Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg believes AI is a force for good

Daily Mail - Science & tech

In June, Professor Stephen Hawking warned that AI, disguised as helpful digital assistants, could one day spell the end for mankind. But not everyone agrees – including Facebook founder, Mark Zuckerberg. In a recent interview, Zuckerberg made a bid to reassure the world that AI is a force for good, and will destroy humanity. Mark Zuckerberg recently spoke to The Macro, saying that we should not see AI as a technological development which will bring about out species' demise A team from the University of Texas have created a new software that integrates humanoid robots and web-based tele-operation to provide humanoid robotic learners more access to the hardware. The software, named'Cloud-based Advanced Robotics Laboratory' (CARL), detects the movements of a human controller's body, mimicking the actions in the robot.