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Europe's wine industry may suffer with global warming

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Global warming may hit wine lovers where it hurts the most - the pocket - as rising temperatures are likely to increase labour costs in Europe's vineyards, researchers said on Thursday. In the hills behind Cyprus's coastal city of Limassol, grape pickers work in average peak temperatures of 36 degrees Celsius (97 degrees F) in August, a month when much of the harvest is brought in. Researchers carrying out a small-scale study found that in the heat, labour loss rose as much as 27 percent and there was a 15 percent drop in the amount of time labourers were able to work. Researchers found in the heat, labour loss rose as much as 27 percent and there was a 15 percent drop in the amount of time labourers were able to work. If temperatures rise because of global warming, labour costs are likely to follow suit, said Andreas Flouris of the School of Exercise Science at the University of Thessaly in Greece.


Study says air pollution killing more people than smoking

Al Jazeera

Air pollution is killing more people every year than smoking, according to research published on Tuesday that called for urgent action to stop burning fossil fuels. Researchers in Germany and Cyprus estimated that air pollution caused 8.8 million extra deaths in 2015, almost double the previously estimated 4.5 million. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates smoking kills about seven million people a year globally. The researchers found that in Europe - the key focus of the European Society of Cardiology research - air pollution caused an estimated 790,000 deaths, between 40 and 80 percent of them from cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. "Since most of the particulate matter and other air pollutants in Europe come from the burning of fossil fuels, we need to switch to other sources for generating energy urgently," said the study's co-author Professor Jos Lelieveld of the Max-Plank Institute for Chemistry in Mainz and the Cyprus Institute Nicosia in Cyprus.


Application of ERA5 and MENA simulations to predict offshore wind energy potential

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This study explores wind energy resources in different locations through the Gulf of Oman and also their future variability due climate change impacts. In this regard, EC-EARTH near surface wind outputs obtained from CORDEX-MENA simulations are used for historical and future projection of the energy. The ERA5 wind data are employed to assess suitability of the climate model. Moreover, the ERA5 wave data over the study area are applied to compute sea surface roughness as an important variable for converting near surface wind speeds to those of wind speed at turbine hub-height. Considering the power distribution, bathymetry and distance from the coats, some spots as tentative energy hotspots to provide detailed assessment of directional and temporal variability and also to investigate climate change impact studies. RCP8.5 as a common climatic scenario is used to project and extract future variation of the energy in the selected sites. The results of this study demonstrate that the selected locations have a suitable potential for wind power turbine plan and constructions.


Keeping six feet apart may not be enough to protect people from COVID-19 during windy weather

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers found that saliva droplets can travel 18 feet (more than five metres) in just five seconds if there is a slight breeze of just around 2.5 miles per hour (4 kph). The findings have been released amid a debate over the amount of distance people need to be putting between each other in order to keep safe from coronavirus. Former Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith has today called for the Prime Minister to consider lowering the two-metre rule as to'get the economy moving'. Keeping six feet -- two metres -- apart may not be enough to protect people from COVID-19 during blustery weather, a study has warned. Researchers found that saliva droplets can travel more than 16 feet in just five seconds if there is a slight breeze of just around 2.5 miles per hour'The droplet cloud will affect both adults and children of different heights,' said applied physicist Dimitris Drikakis of the University of Nicosia in Cyprus.


Mediterranean World Heritage sites could be DESTROYED by rising sea levels

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Nearly 50 iconic historical and cultural sites across the Mediterranean are at risk of destruction in the next century, scientists show. Rising sea levels are endangering the iconic Venetian lagoon as well as the Amalfi Coast, the Cypriot city of Paphos and Pisa's Piazza del Duomo. The UNESCO World Heritage Sites are close to coastal areas and at risk of severe flooding and coastal erosion, researchers said. The Mediterranean is home to a large number of historic sites due to the historical importance of the ports that populate the area. The scientists found that of the 49 coastal sites around the Mediterranean Sea, more than three-quarters (37) are at risk of a severe flood event by the year 2100.