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Five Ways Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Are Transforming Construction

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The potential applications of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) in construction are vast, and for early adopters, these technologies are already helping to make jobsites safer, more efficient and more productive. Requests for information, open issues and change orders are standard in the construction industry. Machine learning is like a smart assistant that can scrutinize this mountain of data, learn from it and then alert project managers about the critical items that need their attention. This type of AI is also being used to track the real-time interactions of workers, machinery and objects on the jobsite and alert supervisors of potential safety issues, construction errors and productivity issues. What are some of the top benefits of using AI and machine learning in the construction industry?


The benefits of AI in construction - UK Construction Online

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The global construction industry has grown by only one per cent per year over the past few decades. Compare this with a growth rate of 3.6% in manufacturing, and 2.8% for the whole world economy. Productivity, or the total economic output per worker, has remained flat in construction. In comparison, productivity has grown 1,500% in retail, manufacturing, and agriculture since 1945. One of the reasons for this is that construction is one of the most under-digitized industries in the world and is slow to adopt new technologies (McKinsey, 2017).


Robotic excavators get a boost with $33 million for Built Robotics ZDNet

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When Built Robotics emerged out of stealth in October 2017, the company's self-driving excavators had completed a couple simple projects that included digging and moving dirt at a community garden and a California mountain bike trail. Since then, giant autonomous robots have been deployed on large commercial projects, such as digging the foundations for wind farms. The technology has also expanded to include bulldozers and skid steers, in addition to excavators. Today Built announced a $33 million Series B led by Next47, the new global venture fund backed by Siemens. This brings the company's total funding to $48 million.


Robotic excavators get a boost with $33 million for Built Robotics ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

When Built Robotics emerged out of stealth in October 2017, the company's self-driving excavators had completed a couple simple projects that included digging and moving dirt at a community garden and a California mountain bike trail. Since then, giant autonomous robots have been deployed on large commercial projects, such as digging the foundations for wind farms. The technology has also expanded to include bulldozers and skid steers, in addition to excavators. Today Built announced a $33 million Series B led by Next47, the new global venture fund backed by Siemens. This brings the company's total funding to $48 million.


Autonomous construction equipment is here

ZDNet

Autonomous construction equipment could be the intermediate step between automated factory equipment and self-driving cars. Although there is plenty of justified enthusiasm for self-driving cars, there are still many technical and regulatory challenges to overcome before we can move automation from enclosed industrial settings to the open road. "I actually think we'll see autonomous equipment commonplace on job sites much sooner than on public roads," says Noah Ready-Campbell, founder of Built Robotics. His company launched out of stealth in October with self-driving construction equipment. These might be the stuff of nightmares.