'Pokémon Go' comes to 26 new countries, but server issues keep many from playing

Mashable

Niantic, Australia-based developer of the planetary hit Pokémon Go, has significantly ramped up the game's global release, launching it in 26 new countries on Saturday. The augmented reality mobile game is now available in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Greenland, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, and Switzerland. Despite gamers' pleas for Niantic to release the game in their respective market, the company may have been a little too eager to launch to so many markets as once. Shortly after launch, many gamers reported on social media that the game is slow to load or even completely unavailable to download. I've managed to play for a couple of minutes in Croatia before the game stopped working; it's still unavailable at the time of this writing, hours after launch.


AI Standards Development

#artificialintelligence

The upcoming meeting of the Joint Technical Committee of International Standards Organisation (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Japan will provide the forum for the further development of international AI Standards. SC42 consists of 28 Participating countries and 13 Observing countries from all over the world. Participating countries include Ireland representatives nominated by National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI) and Australia (SA), Austria (ASI), Belgium (NBN), Benin (ANM), Canada (SCC), China (SAC), Denmark (DS), Finland (SFS), France (AFNOR), Italy (UNI), Japan (JISC), Korea, Republic of (KATS), Luxembourg (ILNAS), Malta (MCCAA), Netherlands (NEN), Norway (SN), Russian Federation (GOST R), Singapore, (SSC), Spain (UNE), Sweden (SIS), Switzerland (SNV), Uganda (UNBS), United Kingdom (BSI) and United States (ANSI). Standardisation has been a driving factor in the creation of the European Unions Digital Single Market. European standards help to eliminate technical barriers to trade contributed to the implementation of European legislation and the development of sustainable industrial policy.


Google Maps will help you park in 25 more cities

Engadget

Back in January, Google rolled out a "parking difficulty" icon in Maps which, as its name suggests, explains how hard it will be to find a spot for your vehicle. While useful, it was only available in 25 US cities, including New York and San Francisco. Today, it's being expanded to a further 25 locations around the globe: Alicante, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Barcelona, Cologne, Darmstadt, Dusseldorf, London, Madrid, Malaga, Manchester, Milan, Montreal, Moscow, Munich, Paris, Prague, Rio de Janeiro, Rome, Sao Paulo, Stockholm, Stuttgart, Toronto, Valencia and Vancouver. Just pop in your destination and you'll see a limited, medium or easy symbol near the bottom of the screen, next to the estimated journey time. The ratings are based on "historical parking data," according to Google, and a smidge of "machine learning magic."


Facebook Marketplace makes its way to 17 European countries

Engadget

If you're looking for stuff to buy online, check out Facebook Marketplace -- it might now be available in your country. The social network has expanded the presence of its eBay and Craigslist rival to cover 17 more countries in Europe, namely Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. It's been accessible in the UK for quite some time. So, how is Marketplace better than eBay or Craigslist? Facebook says "you can feel good about buying and selling on Marketplace" since you can check out a seller's or a buyer's profile, see if you have any mutual friends and how old their accounts are.


Facebook brings Marketplace to 17 European countries

#artificialintelligence

Unfortunately, it's only been available in a handful of countries so far. The company today announced it's rolling out Marketplace to 17 more countries across Europe: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. Unlike the US, where Craigslist is popular throughout most of its major cities, European countries tend to have their own local web stores (though eBay is often a popular option too). Facebook's Marketplace could at least provide another centralized option. The ability to see how long people have been on Facebook and view mutual friends could give users some added peace of mind too.