More states join lawsuit to keep 3D-printed gun plans off the internet

Engadget

On August 1st, Defense Distributed was set to upload designs of 3D-printed guns for the public to buy and download. But the day before, a Seattle judge temporarily blocked their release after seven states and Washington, DC sued the company and State Department. Today, eleven more states have joined the legal battle to stop the firearm plans from being sold online. According to the filing, amended complaint added California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia to the list of states Attorneys General opposing the release of the files. Per the Brady Campaign and Center to Prevent Gun Violence, the preliminary injunction hearing has been scheduled for August 21st and the temporary restraining order has been extended until August 28th.


12 cities to receive Justice Department aid to fight crime

PBS NewsHour

BETHESDA, Maryland -- The Justice Department says it will offer its resources to help 12 U.S. cities fight violent crime. The department said Tuesday it will help local authorities study crime patterns and come up with plans to reduce violence. Attorney General Jeff Sessions says officials will come up with "data-driven, evidence-based strategies" that can be measured over time. The cities are: Birmingham, Alabama; Indianapolis, Indiana; Memphis, Tennessee; Toledo, Ohio; Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Buffalo, New York; Cincinnati, Ohio; Houston, Texas; Jackson, Tennessee; Kansas City, Missouri; Lansing, Michigan; and Springfield, Illinois. The department did not immediately explain how they were selected.


20 attorneys general, all Democrat, demand independent counsel probe Russia meddling

The Japan Times

BOSTON – A group of 20 attorneys general, all Democrats, is calling for the appointment of an independent special counsel to continue the investigation into Russian interference in last year's presidential election. The group led by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey called Republican President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey during the ongoing investigation a "violation of public trust." The group said in a Thursday letter to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein that only the appointment of an independent special counsel "with full powers and resources" can begin to restore public confidence. Those signing the letter include the attorneys general of California, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont and Washington.


Washington State Challenges Trump's Travel Ban Order in Court

U.S. News

On Sunday, attorneys general from 16 states – California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Vermont and Washington – and the District of Columbia issued a joint statement calling the order "un-American and unlawful" and backedefforts by the American Civil Liberties Union and other organizations challenging the orders in federal court.


Bumble Bee files bankruptcy amid antitrust fines and lawsuits

The Japan Times

NEW YORK – Bumble Bee Foods LLC, the largest North American brand of packaged seafood, filed for bankruptcy amid criminal fines and civil lawsuits stemming from a federal price-fixing case with plans for its assets to be acquired by FCF Co. for about $925 million. The canned-tuna purveyor sought creditor protection under Chapter 11 in Wilmington, Delaware, listing assets and liabilities of as much as $1 billion each, according to court papers. It has arranged an $80 million term loan from its current lenders and a $200 million revolving credit facility to keep operating while in bankruptcy, the documents showed. Bumble Bee, based in San Diego, California, and owned by London-based private equity firm Lion Capital LLC, pleaded guilty in 2017 to conspiring with Starkist Co. and Chicken of the Sea Inc. to fix and raise prices in the U.S. The company flagged its financial distress at the time of sentencing, arguing the $81.5 million fine initially levied could push it into insolvency. The U.S. Department of Justice agreed, cutting the amount to $25 million and giving Bumble Bee an installment plan over several years that required no more than $2 million upfront.