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Infineon, Synopsys develop AI accelerator chip for smart cars

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AI and neural networks are essential building blocks for automated driving, for example in the classification and tracking of objects or in determining the route in traffic. In addition, they help to optimize many other automotive applications, reduce the cost of ECUs, improve their performance and accelerate their market launch. For example, AI and neural networks enable optimized autocalibration of engines and reduce the number of sensors required by generating precise mathematical models of the physical reactions in a system. At the same time, AI applications require significantly more computing power than standard algorithms. Therefore, Infineon's Aurix microcontrollers will be equipped with a Parallel Processing Unit (PPU) specifically for processing AI algorithms.


Teraki wins backing from Infineon for its automotive AI technology

ZDNet

Teraki announced that Infineon Systems will use its latest AI edge processing software in a family of automotive microcontrollers that will improve the safety of autonomous vehicles. Hyperloop technologies could revolutionise travel: here's everything you need to know about the technology and the companies involved. The Berlin, Germany-based startup said that its software is designed for processing large amounts of automotive sensor data combined with machine learning to achieve up to 10 times the processing speed by just using existing automotive hardware. Normally, the constrained hardware environment of an automobile prohibits the processing of the large amounts of data that autonomous vehicle systems require without specialist chips. "Automobiles are adding ever larger amounts of sensors to enable autonomous vehicles and this explosion in data is a problem because of latency." said Daniel Richart CEO and co-founder of Teraki.


Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto

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Products/Services Visa agreed to acquire the token and electronic ticketing business of Rambus for $75 million in cash. The business involved is part of the Smart Card Software subsidiary of Rambus. It includes the former Bell ID mobile-payment businesses and the Ecebs smart-ticketing systems for transit providers. Meanwhile, Rambus expanded its CryptoManager Root of Trust product line. "Security is a mission-critical imperative for SoC designs serving virtually every application space," Neeraj Paliwal, vice president of products, cryptography at Rambus, said in a statement.


Record-breaking robot solves Rubik's cube in 0.637 SECONDS

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Rubik's cube was devised by Hungarian architect Erno Rubik more than 30 years ago, but he likely never envisioned his puzzle being cracked this quickly. The machine, known as'Sub1 Reloaded' and developed by German tech company Infineon, was aided by one of the world's most powerful microcomputers, solved a Rubik's cube in 0.637 seconds at the Electronica Trade Fair in Munich, Germany earlier this year. The machine, known as'Sub1 Reloaded' and developed by German tech company Infineon, was aided by one of the world's most powerful microcomputers'Guinness World Records has spent some time carefully reviewing the evidence, including ensuring that the cube and the pre-scrambling met all WCA standards, before confirming the new record today,' the organisation said. The robot took a fraction of a second to analyse the cube and make 21 moves to solve the puzzle. Its time of 0.637 seconds beat the previous world record of 0.887 seconds, set by an earlier prototype of the same machine.


Robot solves a Rubik's cube in just 0.637 SECONDS, smashing world record

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Rubik's cube was devised by Hungarian architect Erno Rubik more than 30 years ago, but he likely never envisioned his puzzle being cracked this quickly. A robot has this week solved a Rubik's cube in 0.637 seconds, at the Electronica Trade Fair in Munich, Germany. The machine, known as'Sub1 Reloaded' and developed by German tech company Infineon, was aided by one of the world's most powerful microcomputers. The machine, known as'Sub1 Reloaded' and developed by German tech company Infineon, was aided by one of the world's most powerful microcomputers The robot took a fraction of a second to analyse the cube and make 21 moves to solve the puzzle. Its time of 0.637 seconds beat the previous world record of 0.887 seconds, set by an earlier prototype of the same machine.