Google Beating Grandmaster Sedol Is Bigger Than IBM Beating Kasparov - Singularity HUB

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It's been an emotional week in the realm of game AI as the world watched the historic five-game showdown between legendary Go world champion Lee Sedol and Google DeepMind's famed deep learning AI AlphaGo. All five games were held at the Four Seasons Hotel in Seoul, South Korea, and as events played out, millions around the world became increasingly captivated. Anticipation for the match began growing in January, when Google's UK-based AI group DeepMind, led by CEO Demis Hassabis, announced their computer algorithm AlphaGo defeated three-time European Go champion Fan Hui 5 games to 0--a victory some experts didn't expect a computer to achieve for a decade. At the end of a Google blog post announcing the win was the promise of a best-of-five face-off between AlphaGo and 18-time international Go champion Lee Sedol, a match equivalent to IBM's Deep Blue defeat of Garry Kasparov in chess in 1997. Notably, Go is inherently more complex than chess and AlphaGo, at least in part, trained itself to play the game.


AlphaGo Wins Final Game In Match Against Champion Go Player

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

AlphaGo, a largely self-taught Go-playing AI, last night won the fifth and final game in a match held in Seoul, South Korea, against that country's Lee Sedol. Sedol is one of the greatest modern players of the ancient Chinese game. The final score was 4 games to 1. Thus falls the last and computationally hardest game that programmers have taken as a test of machine intelligence. Chess, AI's original touchstone, fell to the machines 19 years ago, but Go had been expected to last for many years to come. The sweeping victory means far more than the US 1 million prize, which Google's London-based acquisition, DeepMind, says it will give to charity.


Spending Christmas in the World of Warcraft

BBC News

World of Warcraft allows players to dive into a vast fantasy realm populated with players from around the world. Together they battle to survive alongside dragons, trolls and warlocks - even on Christmas Day. Video games have long proved a formidable force in capturing the hearts, imaginations and wallets of people all over the world. The most immersive gaming experience, according to its fans, is World of Warcraft and in Azeroth, where the game is set, even Christmas Day is celebrated with turkey feasts, snowball fights and presents under a tree. In a time where many of us spend more time online, what does it mean to celebrate 25 December in a virtual world?


How Big Is The Map In 'Assassin's Creed: Odyssey'? Does Size Matter?

Forbes - Tech

The map of Damascus in the first Assassin's Creed was 0.13km². Since then, the map in each successive game has been bigger than the one before. Based on that history, we can expect the map for the upcoming AC: Odyssey to be bigger than last year's brilliant AC: Origins. Dimitras Galatas put together a short video comparing maps from several of the Assassin's Creed games. The map of Greece for Odyssey is shown at 130km², a substantial increase over the tiny map of Damascus and more than 2.5 times as large as AC: Origin's 80km² map of Egypt.


What We Know and What We Don't About PUBG's Legal Fight With Fortnite In Korea

Forbes - Tech

PARIS, FRANCE - MAY 03: A gamer plays the video game'Fortnite: Battle Royale' developed by People Can Fly and Epic Games. Fortnite is an online video game of survival and construction available on consoles, PC and, recently, on iPhone. Released in July 2017, it has been growing in popularity in recent months. Fortnite, which brings together more than 40 million players each month around the world, brings a fortune to its creators. The Korean Times reported that South Korean game developer and Bluehole subsidiary PUBG Corporation filed a copyright lawsuit in South Korea in January against Epic Games.