Goto

Collaborating Authors

Best drones for kids: Find a toy drone that's safe, sturdy, and easy to fly

Mashable

So your kid wants a drone. That's not surprising: They've been a hot holiday gift for a few years running, and more options than ever are explicitly marketed toward the younger set. Still, there are a lot of drones out there, and it can be hard to tell not only which are actually good, but also which are safe, sturdy, and beginner-friendly enough for children. Your young pilot will probably crash this thing a few times, after all -- in a lot of cases (though not all!), a low-cost toy drone is your best bet. When it comes right down to it, the best drones for kids are ones that will be relatively easy to fly and can take a beating.


Dildo-drone will fly out of your crotch and into your heart

Mashable

Drones: they deliver weapons, Amazon packages, and now -- enormous orgasms. A new drone by a mysterious company called Dildo Everything gives dildos the wings to fly. Sure, it's entirely possible that the product is a fake (dildodrone.com What more do you want out of life? The product comes from the makers of the dildo selfie stick -- another fake product that desperately needs to exist.


Xiaomi will soon launch its very own drone

Mashable

Is there anything Xiaomi can't do? The Chinese company, known for making cheap but powerful smartphones, makes a ton of other gadgets, including a kid-oriented smartwatch, a fitness band, a 4K-ready media box, a rice cooker (yes, really) and a self-balancing scooter. Now, judging by an image posted on the company's Weibo account, it's also going to launch a drone. SEE ALSO: Xiaomi Mi Max is a 6.44-inch behemoth of a phone Besides an image of a bug-resembling, futuristic looking drone, and a date -- May 25 -- the poster contains no additional info about the device. Last week's teaser, which consisted only of an image of a wooden propeller, offered even less in terms of details.


The best way to get a gift you'll really like is to buy it yourself. Case in point: This drone.

Mashable

Heads up: All products featured here are selected by Mashable's commerce team and meet our rigorous standards for awesomeness. If you buy something, Mashable may earn an affiliate commission.


Nature inspired weightlifter drone

#artificialintelligence

Inspired by wasps and spiders that need to drag prey from place to place, but can't actually lift it, engineers at Stanford and Switzerland's EPFL have created drones that brace themselves against the ground to get the requisite torque. The grippy feet and strong threads or jaws let them pull objects many times their weight along the ground. These FlyCroTugs (a combination of flying, micro and tug, presumably) act like ordinary tiny drones while in the air, able to move freely about and land wherever they need to. But they're equipped with three critical components: an anchor to attach to objects, a winch to pull on that anchor and sticky feet to provide sure grip while doing so. The engineers claim that the drones are capable of moving objects 40 times their weight.