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Ordinary WiFi devices can be used to detect suspicious luggage, bombs, weapons

ZDNet

Wi-Fi signals from ordinary Wi-Fi equipment can be used to detect suspicious objects, such as bombs or weapons, inside people's bags or luggage, at schools, stadiums, museums, malls, or other public spaces. Researchers from Rutgers University say they've developed and tested such a system, achieving above 90 percent detection rates for suspicious objects hidden inside various types of containers. Their system works by using a radio signal called CSI (Channel State Information). CSI signals are part of the Wi-Fi protocol and are used to record general information about the status of the Wi-Fi signal. The Rutgers team say they discovered that by reading the CSI data from Wi-Fi signals that have bounced off or went through objects in a room or open space, they can determine the nature and size of that respective object.


TSA testing fingerprint check-in in Denver and Atlanta

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is testing new checkpoint screening technology that could mean the end of the boarding pass in airports in Atlanta and Denver. The technology allows a traveler's fingerprints to serve as a boarding pass and an identity document, in the place of a passport. It works by matching a traveler's fingerprints to those that have previously been provided to the TSA by travelers who have enrolled in the TSA Pre program - an expedited security screening program. The TSA technology allows a traveler's fingerprints to serve as a boarding pass and an identity document, in the place of a passport The technology is being tested Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport - the world's busiest airport - and Denver International Airport, starting this week. At the moment, the technology works on the basis of matching passenger fingerprints to those previously registered when passengers enroll in the TSA Pre program which expedites security screenings.


AI-powered body scanners could soon speed up your airport check-in

#artificialintelligence

A startup bankrolled by Bill Gates is about to conduct the first public trials of high-speed body scanners powered by artificial intelligence (AI), the Guardian can reveal. According to documents filed with the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Boston-based Evolv Technology is planning to test its system at Union Station in Washington DC, in Los Angeles's Union Station metro and at Denver international airport. Evolv uses the same millimetre-wave radio frequencies as the controversial, and painfully slow, body scanners now found at many airport security checkpoints. However, the new device can complete its scan in a fraction of second, using computer vision and machine learning to spot guns and bombs. Homeland Security: 'be patient' as airport lines reach extreme lengths This means passengers can simply walk through a scanning gate without stopping or even slowing down – like the hi-tech scanners seen in the 1990 sci-fi film Total Recall.


AI-powered body scanners could soon speed up your airport check-in

#artificialintelligence

A startup bankrolled by Bill Gates is about to conduct the first public trials of high-speed body scanners powered by artificial intelligence (AI), the Guardian can reveal. According to documents filed with the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Boston-based Evolv Technology is planning to test its system at Union Station in Washington DC, in Los Angeles's Union Station metro and at Denver international airport. Evolv uses the same millimetre-wave radio frequencies as the controversial, and painfully slow, body scanners now found at many airport security checkpoints. However, the new device can complete its scan in a fraction of second, using computer vision and machine learning to spot guns and bombs. This means passengers can simply walk through a scanning gate without stopping or even slowing down – like the hi-tech scanners seen in the 1990 sci-fi film Total Recall.


New fingerprint test detects cocaine in seconds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new fingerprint test can detect cocaine in a person's system in seconds, according to a new study. Fingerprint testing would likely eliminate the risk of labs mixing up different test results. This new method of testing could be modified to test for other controlled substances, like heroin, methadone and prescription opioids. Fingerprint drug screening could become the new standard for courts, prisons and employers in as little as five years, researchers from University of Surrey say. The study, published in Clinical Chemistry, found that cocaine could be detected by developing the print using a chemical that does not affect the drug signals, or molecular traces, in the fingerprint.