Sutter Health partners with Ferrum to deliver safer care with an AI-powered patient safety platform

#artificialintelligence

"It's like going from lifting 200 pounds at the gym to being able to lift a car." As a national leader in patient safety and quality, Sutter Health continues to stay on the leading edge by using Artificial Intelligence (AI) and other cutting-edge technologies to better serve its patients across the continuum of care. In August, Sutter Medical Foundation in the North Valley went live with Ferrum's AI-powered continuous quality coverage platform for lung cancers, becoming the first center in the country to run quality assurance on 100% of its applicable CT scans. During a typical 10-hour shift, radiologists can "see" over 100 patients, covering a multitude of health issues from cancer imaging to spine fractures, brain imaging for stroke, coronary artery pathology, and more. "Many of the studies that radiologists routinely interpret also include a portion of the lungs, and when they do, we are trained to look for nodules in the lungs as part of our search pattern," said Jason Wiesner, M.D., a Sutter Medical Group radiologist and a key member of the pilot project team.


Mechanical Chess Player

Classics

Transactions of the Ninth Conference March 20-21, 1952, Macy Foundation, New York, N. Y.



A Modest Proposal for the March for Science

The New Yorker

In 1959, not long after the Soviets' Sputnik launch astonished and terrified the nation, Dwight Eisenhower named George B. Kistiakowsky, a Harvard chemist, to the position of Presidential science adviser. Jerome Wiesner, who would later become the president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, sat on the Presidential science-advisory committee. Kistiakowsky was a Republican and Wiesner a Democrat. They met with the President every month. The next year, when John F. Kennedy was elected, Kistiakowsky wasn't purged, or prosecuted, or denounced.


The radical nanobattery that could charge your phone in five SECONDS

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A group from Cornell University has built an innovative nanobattery that could charge your electronics in just seconds. The group redesigned a standard battery so that instead of having the batteries' anode and cathode on either side of a nonconducting separator, they intertwined the components in a self-assembling, 3-D gyroidal structure. This made it so that thousands of nanoscale pores filled with the elements necessary for energy storage and delivery. A group from Cornell University has built an innovative nanobattery that has the potential to charge electronics in just seconds. Instead of having the batteries' anode and cathode on either side of a nonconducting separator they intertwined the components in a self-assembling, 3-D gyroidal structure'This is truly a revolutionary battery architecture,' said Ulrich Wiesner, professor of engineering at the school.