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Quantum Internet Is 13 Years Away. Wait, What's Quantum Internet?

WIRED

A year ago this week, Chinese physicists launched the world's first quantum satellite. Unlike the dishes that deliver your Howard Stern and cricket tournaments, this 1,400-pound behemoth doesn't beam radio waves. Instead, the physicists designed it to send and receive bits of information encoded in delicate photons of infrared light. It's a test of a budding technology known as quantum communications, which experts say could be far more secure than any existing info relay system. They've kept the satellite busy.


Microsoft 'doubles down' on futuristic quantum computers

PCWorld

Microsoft is accelerating its efforts to make a quantum computer as it looks to a future of computing beyond today's PCs and servers. Microsoft has researched quantum computing for more than a decade. Now the company's goal is to put the theory to work and create actual hardware and software. To that effect, Microsoft has put Todd Holmdahl--who was involved in the development of Kinect, HoloLens, and Xbox--to lead the effort to create quantum hardware and software. The company has also hired four prominent university professors to contribute to the company's research.


Everyone is jumping on the quantum computing bandwagon, but why?

New Scientist

Quantum computing is booming, but is it a bubble? At a gathering of experts on this technology in California last week, nobody seemed to know how, or even if, it will turn out to be useful. The race for quantum supremacy may be over, but the race for a useful quantum computer is still on.


Why AI still needs us: To build quantum computers

PCWorld

Quantum mechanics are notoriously mind-bending because so-called "qubits" -- the atomic-scale building blocks of quantum computers -- can inhabit more than one physical state at once. That's known as superposition, and it's what gives the prospect of quantum computers their exciting potential. It's just potential at this point, however, because there are still many, many challenges to be solved before we can create a working quantum computer. A recent study focused on the game Quantum Moves, which is based on a real problem in quantum computing. Essentially, players are asked to move an atom among wells in an egg-carton-like container without disturbing the delicate quantum state.


Why AI still needs us: To build quantum computers

#artificialintelligence

We humans may still be licking our wounds following AI's victory at the ancient game of Go, but it turns out we still have something to be proud of: We're doing a lot better than machines are at solving some of the key problems of quantum computing. Quantum mechanics are notoriously mind-bending because so-called "qubits" -- the atomic-scale building blocks of quantum computers -- can inhabit more than one physical state at once. That's known as superposition, and it's what gives the prospect of quantum computers their exciting potential. It's just potential at this point, however, because there are still many, many challenges to be solved before we can create a working quantum computer. That's where gaming comes in.