European countries ban bee-harming pesticides

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Campaigners have hailed a decision by European countries to bring in a near-total ban on pesticides linked to declines in bees as a'major victory'. European Union member states have decided on a ban on the outdoor use of'neonicotinoid' pesticides after an assessment by the European Food Safety Authority (Efsa) confirmed in February the dangers they posed to bees. Use of the three pesticides is already restricted in the European Union on crops such as oil seed rape, because of the concerns they have'sub-lethal' effects such as harming the bees' ability to forage and form colonies. European Union member states have decided on a ban on the outdoor use of'neonicotinoid' pesticides after an assessment by the European Food Safety Authority (Efsa) confirmed in February the dangers they posed to bees (stock image) Member states have now endorsed proposals by the European Commission to completely ban the outdoor uses of the three active substances, meaning they can only be used in greenhouses. The Efsa assessment, which looked at the impact on wild solitary bees and bumblebees as well as honey bees, confirmed that most uses of the chemicals pose a risk to the insects.


The European Union has decided to ban bee-killing pesticides

New Scientist

Campaigners have hailed a decision by European countries to bring in a near-total ban on pesticides linked to declines in bees as a "major victory". European Union member states have decided on a ban on the outdoor use of "neonicotinoid" pesticides, after an assessment by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) confirmed in February the dangers they posed to bees. Use of the three pesticides is already restricted in the European Union on crops such as oil seed rape, because of the concerns they have "sub-lethal" effects such as harming the bees' ability to forage and form colonies. Member states have now endorsed proposals by the European Commission to completely ban the outdoor uses of the three active substances, meaning they can only be used in greenhouses. However, how farmers replace the pesticides will be crucial, says Dave Goulson of the University of Sussex, UK. "If these neonicotinoids are simply replaced by other similar compounds such as sulfoxaflor, cyantraniliprole and flupyradifurone (all new systemic insecticides), then we will simply be going round in circles," he says.


Call for pesticides ban after risks to bees confirmed

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The most widely used pesticides are likely to be banned across the EU after a study revealed they do represent a risk to wild bees and honey bees.


A quarter of British honey is contaminated with pesticides

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A quarter of British honey is contaminated with pesticides called neonicotinoids that pose a serious threat to bees, research has revealed.


Three quarters of honey contains harmful pesticides

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Three-quarters of the honey produced around the world contain pesticides that can harm bees and pose a health risk to humans, a study has shown. Scientists who tested 198 honey samples found 75 per cent were laced with at least one of the neonicotinoid chemicals - which can attack the human nervous system in high doses. Experts called the findings'alarming', 'sobering' and a'serious environmental concern' while stressing the pesticide levels generally fell well below the safe limits for human consumption. Honeybees on a freshly built comb during the harvest season. Neonicotinoids are neuro-active chemicals similar to nicotine that have proved to be highly effective at protecting crops from pests, especially aphids and root-eating grubs.