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12-Year-Old Wins Geographic Bee in Nail-Biter--How Would You Do?

National Geographic

In addition to those previously mentioned, the other finalists this year included Rishi Kumar from Maryland, Samanyu Dixit from North Carolina, Ashwin Sivakumar from Oregon (pronounced to rhyme with gin, not Bonn, he noted), Pranay Varada from Texas, and Thomas Wright from Wisconsin. Many more students will compete in future years; Alex Trebek, who hosted the National Geographic Bee for 25 years, recently endowed the program to keep it going in perpetuity.


The Woman Who Shaped National Geographic

National Geographic

Three Japanese girls in kimonos are framed by cherry blossoms. Eliza Scidmore later helped bring the trees to Washington, D.C. Tired of society life in Washington, D.C., she was inspired by the dramatic scenery described by naturalist John Muir in the San Francisco Bulletin. The uncharted northern tundra had been purchased from Russia in the 1860s, but few Americans had yet visited it. The intrepid 27-year-old writer and photographer decided to see it for herself. Every morning Scidmore would rise at 6 for coffee and rolls, then spend the day viewing auroras and writing letters.


Searching for the Himalaya's Ghost Cats - Overheard at National Geographic

National Geographic

Searching for the Himalaya’s Ghost Cats National Geographic’s editor at large Peter Gwin travels to the Himalaya to join photographer and National Geographic explorer Prasenjeet Yadav on his search for snow leopards, one of the planet’s most elusive animals in one of its most forbidding landscapes. Himalayan communities have long regarded the snow leopards as threats to their livelihoods, but conservation efforts and tourism are changing the way people see them. For more information on this episode, visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard. Want more?  For Peter Gwin’s reporting on snow leopards in Kibber, National Geographic magazine subscribers can read his piece, “Himalaya Snow Leopards Are Finally Coming Into View.”  And if you want to see photos that National Geographic explorer Prasenjeet Yadav has captured of snow leopards, head to his instagram page: @prasen.yadav.  Also explore:  For basic information on snow leopards, here’s National Geographic’s reference page on the species. Subscribers can also see beautiful illustrations that show how the snow leopard’s anatomy has adapted to the harsh Himalaya environment and read about how poaching is threatening the species in Asia. 


Christ’s tomb uncovered

FOX News

After uncovering the stone slab venerated as Jesus Christ's burial place, archaeologists have now examined the interior of the tomb in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The tomb is a limestone shelf or burial bed hewn from the wall of a cave, National Geographic reports. Covered by marble cladding since at least 1555 A.D., it was exposed Oct. 26 as part of a major restoration project at the church. An initial inspection by a team from the National Technical University of Athens revealed a layer of fill material beneath the marble cladding. Additional work revealed another marble slab with a cross carved into its surface, according to National Geographic.


Pakistan to deport National Geographic's 'Afghan Girl'

U.S. News

FILE - In this file photo taken on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, the owner of a book shop shows a copy of a magazine with the photograph of Afghan refugee woman Sharbat Gulla, from his rare collection in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani prosecutor said Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016 that a court has dismissed a bail plea from National Geographic's famed green-eyed'Afghan Girl,' arrested a week ago over allegedly forged ID papers.