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AI-generated portrait sells for a whopping $432,000 at auction

Mashable

Well, here's another job artificial intelligence can do instead of humans. AI-generated artwork Portrait of Edmond Belamy sold for 45 times its anticipated price at Christie's, going under the hammer for an eye-watering $435,000 in New York. While the painting (of sorts) is done by computers, the project is actually the creation of Obvious, a Parisian collective consisting of Hugo Caselles-Dupré, Pierre Fautrel and Gauthier Vernier. It's the first AI-created artwork that's gone to auction, and was created by an algorithm which uses thousands of portraits to create the image. "The algorithm is composed of two parts," Caselles-Dupré explained in a statement online.


Portrait of Edmond Belamy to become world's first AI painting to go up for auction Verdict

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Auction house Christie's made headlines last year with the record-breaking $450m sale of Leonardo da Vinci's Salvator Mundi. Tomorrow's sale of the Generative Adversarial Network's Portrait of Edmond Belamy will likely be a far less significant event, but it could signal a changing of the guard in the art world as the Old Masters give way to a technology-dominated future. The sale of Portrait of Edmond Belamy will be another huge milestone for Christie's. This will be the first time in history that a piece of artwork generated by artificial intelligence (AI) will go up for auction. The picture depicts a blurred man in a white shirt and dark jacket, standing off centre.


Christie's sells painting created by artificial intelligence for $432,500

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This photo provided by Christie's shows a portrait of Edmond de Belamy, a work of art created by artificial intelligence. Renowned auction house Christie's sold the first piece of art created by an algorithm for $432,500. The painting, titled "The Portrait of Edmond Belamy," was completed by artificial intelligence managed by a Paris-based collective called Obvious, Christie's said. According to an online catalog on Christie's website, the painting had been estimated to go for $7,000-$10,000. The art work features a fictional person named Edmond de Belamy, described by Christie's as a "portly gentleman, possibly French and -- to judge by his dark frockcoat and plain white collar -- a man of the church."


Christie's sells painting created by artificial intelligence for $432,500

#artificialintelligence

Renowned auction house Christie's sold the first piece of art created by an algorithm for $432,500. The painting, titled "The Portrait of Edmond Belamy," was completed by artificial intelligence managed by a Paris-based collective called Obvious, Christie's said. According to an online catalog on Christie's website, the painting had been estimated to go for $7,000-$10,000. The art work features a fictional person named Edmond de Belamy, described by Christie's as a "portly gentleman, possibly French and -- to judge by his dark frockcoat and plain white collar -- a man of the church." The signature on the painting is the actual algorithm used to create it.


Christie's Is First to Sell Art Made by Artificial Intelligence, But What Does That Mean?

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On Thursday, the AI-generated "Portrait of Edmond Belamy" sold for $432,500--some 45 times its estimated value--in a sale trumpeted by Christie's as the first auction to feature work created by artificial intelligence. It's a moment likely to be marked in the timeline of both AI and art history, but what, exactly, does the sale signify? For the AI community, the Verge's James Vincent writes in the days preceding the bidding war, the auction provoked controversy among those who argued that the humans behind the canvas (a trio of 25-year-olds best known as the Paris-based art collective Obvious) relied heavily on 19-year-old Robbie Barrat's algorithms yet failed to sufficiently credit him. If the work was truly authored by this string of numbers and letters, does it matter who built and trained the AI? And, given the relatively blurred, imprecise vision the portrait--which Vulture art critic Jerry Saltz scathingly describes as "100 percent generic"--offers of its dour-looking subject, does "Edmond Belamy" even deserve a place in the art history canon? There are no straightforward answers to these questions.