Google Privacy Checkup FAQ: How to limit tracking and still use the apps you love

PCWorld

Google may have been caught being less than clear about how, when, and where it tracks your location, but the company isn't actually doing anything about it. Aside from a clearer explanation on its privacy page about what Location History means and doesn't mean, it's business as usual with your Google account. But if Google's tracking treachery rankles you, you can do something about it--and you don't have to delete Google from your life entirely to do so (tempting as that sounds). You might not know it, but you have a surprising amount of control over your Google account, as long as you know where to find all the switches. Here's everything you need to know about Google's privacy settings: where to find them, what you can turn off, and how it all affects your phone.



3 ways to clean up your online history on Facebook, Google and Apple's Safari

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Columnist Kim Komando tells you how to clean up your digital tracks on Facebook, Google and elsewhere on the Internet. Your computer stores a huge amount of browsing data, and in places you might never think to look. This meticulous chronology makes you vulnerable to snoops and advertising trackers. Here are three ways to cover your tracks, using two of the biggest services on the Internet. You may be surprised how closely these companies follow you, but you may be even more surprised how much control you have over it.


3 ways to start your year with a digital clean slate

FOX News

File photo: In this photo illustration, a Facebook logo on a computer screen is seen through a magnifying glass held by a woman in Bern May 19, 2012.


Google Maps is the latest app to be targeted by criminals

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Even if you have'Location History' off, Google often stores your precise location. Here's how to delete those markers and some best-effort practices that keep your location as private as possible. But there's no panacea, because simply connecting to the internet on any device flags an IP address that can be geographically mapped. Smartphones also connect to cell towers, so your carrier knows your general location at all times. Fire up your browser and go to myactivity.google.com.