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U.N. slaps tough new sanctions on North Korea over missile and nuclear programs

The Japan Times

UNITED NATIONS – The U.N. Security Council unanimously approved tough new sanctions Saturday to punish North Korea for its escalating nuclear and missile programs including a ban on coal and other exports worth over $1 billion -- a huge bite in its total exports, valued at $3 billion last year. U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley called the resolution "the single largest economic sanctions package ever leveled against the North Korean regime" and "the most stringent set of sanctions on any country in a generation." But she warned that it is not enough and "we should not fool ourselves into thinking we have solved the problem -- not even close." "The threat of an outlaw nuclearized North Korean dictatorship remains … (and) is rapidly growing more dangerous," Haley told council members after the vote. The U.S.-drafted resolution, negotiated with North Korea's neighbor and ally China, is aimed at increasing economic pressure on Pyongyang to return to negotiations on its nuclear and missile programs -- a point stressed by all 15 council members in speeches after the vote.


U.N. Security Council to vote Wednesday on North Korea sanctions, diplomats say

The Japan Times

UNITED NATIONS – The United Nations Security Council is set to vote Wednesday to impose new sanctions on North Korea for its fifth and largest nuclear test, slashing Pyongyang's export earnings by some $800 million, diplomats said on Monday. Diplomats said the council's five veto-wielding powers -- the United States, China, Britain, Russia and France -- had agreed to new measures, seen by Reuters on Friday, that largely target the hermit Asian state's coal export earnings. "We didn't get everything we wanted," said a U.S. official familiar with the draft resolution, though he added the proposed new sanctions were "pretty good." North Korea has been under U.N. sanctions since 2006 over its nuclear and missile tests. It conducted its latest nuclear test on Sept. 9, and the United States and China, a North Korea ally, spent over two months negotiating new sanctions.


'THIS HAS TO STOP' UN slaps new sanctions on N. Korea after missile tests

FOX News

The United Nations Security Council Saturday unanimously approved new sanctions against North Korea in the wake of the communist nation's first successful tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of reaching the United States. The sanctions resolution bans North Korean exports of coal, iron, iron ore, lead, lead ore and seafood -- resources that are worth over $1 billion to the regime of Kim Jong Un. North Korea exported an estimated $3 billion worth of goods last year. U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley praised the new sanctions, telling council members after the vote that it is "the single largest economic package ever leveled against the North Korean regime." Countries are also banned from giving any additional permits to North Korean laborers -- another source of money for Pyongyang.


New U.N. sanctions resolution will slash North Korean exports by one-third

The Japan Times

UNITED NATIONS – A proposed new U.N. sanctions resolution will significantly increase economic pressure on North Korea to return to negotiations on its nuclear and missile programs by banning mineral and seafood exports worth over $1 billion -- a third of its total exports last year, a Security Council diplomat said Friday. The draft resolution, obtained by AP, will also ban countries from giving any additional permits to North Korean laborers -- another source of money for Kim Jong Un's regime. And it would prohibit all new joint ventures with North Korean companies, and stop new foreign investment in existing joint ventures. Egypt, which holds the Security Council presidency, said a vote on the draft resolution has been scheduled at 3 p.m. Saturday at U.N. headquarters in New York. The proposed new sanctions follow North Korea's first successful tests of intercontinental ballistic missiles capable of reaching the United States on July 3 and July 27.


Oil will keeping flowing to North Korea, but nuclear-armed nation certain to feel pinch

The Japan Times

UNITED NATIONS/SEOUL – North Korea will be feeling the pain of new United Nations sanctions targeting some of its biggest remaining foreign revenue streams. But the U.N. Security Council eased off the biggest target of all: the oil the North needs to stay alive and to fuel its million-man military. Though the United States had proposed a complete ban, the sanctions by the Security Council cap Pyongyang's annual imports of crude oil at the same level they have been for the past 12 months: an estimated 4 million barrels. Exports of North Korean textiles are prohibited, and other nations are barred from authorizing new work permits for North Korean workers, putting a squeeze on two key sources of hard currency. The measures were approved unanimously Monday.