What Causes Autism? Flu Shot During Pregnancy Not Linked To Diagnosis In Children, New Study Finds

International Business Times

Receiving a flu shot while pregnant will not put a child at risk of later being diagnosed with autism. A new study published Tuesday in JAMA Pediatrics concluded that there is no link that finds the children of women who catch the flu while pregnant or receive a flu shot during pregnancy are later diagnosed with autism. The study pulled medical records from 196,929 children all born at the same Northern California hospital, Kaiser Permanente facilities, between 2000 and 2010. Of those, 3,101 were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, NPR reported. Although there was no direct link found in mothers who had the flu while pregnant and their child being diagnosed with autism, there was a slight increased risk for mothers who received a flu vaccine during their first trimester.


California doctor saves life of fellow colleague with kidney donation

FOX News

But Dr. Colleen Coleman did so by going under the knife to help an ailing colleague who desperately needed a kidney. Coleman donated to Dr. Brian Dunn, an anesthesiologist she works with at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach whose kidneys failed from chemotherapy he received as a teenager to treat a stomach tumor. Coleman came through after one donor withdrew her offer and Dunn's doctor advised him against accepting a kidney from a patient with Lou Gehrig's disease. "I thought, it's not going to happen," Dunn told The Orange County Register. He had received a kidney from his mother when he was 25, but donated kidneys don't last forever.


Doctor donates kidney to save ailing colleague

The Japan Times

NEWPORT BEACH, CALIFORNIA – It's not unusual for a surgeon to save another doctor's life. But Dr. Colleen Coleman did so by going under the knife to help an ailing colleague who desperately needed a kidney. Coleman donated to Dr. Brian Dunn, an anesthesiologist she works with at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach whose kidneys failed from chemotherapy he received as a teenager to treat a stomach tumor. Coleman came through after one donor withdrew her offer and Dunn's doctor advised him against accepting a kidney from a patient with Lou Gehrig's disease. "I thought, it's not going to happen," Dunn told The Orange County Register (bit.ly/2mzIzpQ)


Pink October's Predecessor

Slate

Within a few short years, Christmas Seals had become iconic, raising millions for TB societies. They spent that money on based on local needs: Many localities built new TB wards to keep sick people away from healthy ones. In Chicago, Christmas Seal funds were used to study the correlation between industrial labor and TB, since so many factory workers contracted it. In Vermont, they paid for measures to protect granite workers from the respiratory harms of flying dust. Other programs focused on quality-of-life concerns: In New York, seals funds were used for reintegration initiatives for former patients, since the city's aggressive TB control measures involved long stretches of mandatory isolation and lost wages.


Sam Shepard, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and keen observer of American family life, dies at 73

PBS NewsHour

Actor Sam Shepard, seen here during the Winter 2014 TCA presentations in Pasadena, California, died last week at the age of 73. Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor Sam Shepard died in Kentucky last week following a battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, a spokesperson for the family told news outlets. He was 73 years old. Shepard's acclaimed plays, known for their surrealist elements, dark humor and keen observations of the American family, include "True West," "Fool for Love" and "Buried Child," which won the Pulitzer Prize for drama. Shepard was also nominated for an Academy Award for his role as Chuck Yeager in the 1983 film "The Right Stuff," the story of the astronauts who made the first manned spaceflight by the United States.