Study links human actions to specific Arctic sea ice melt

U.S. News

The study calculates that for every ton of carbon dioxide put in the air, there's 29 square feet less of sea ice (for every metric ton, there's 3 square meters less) during the crucial month when the Arctic region is least frozen. Using observations, statistics and 30 different computer models, the study authors show heat-trapping gases cause warming and the melting of sea ice in a way that can be translated into a simple mathematical formula.


Colorado Study Upends Assumptions About Human-Bear Conflicts

U.S. News

Colorado officials quickly could end their policy of euthanizing bears in response to the findings, Colorado State University conservation biologist Barry Noon said. However, he said, "the key driver of bear populations is going to be the carrying capacity of the environment. And that is going to be related to soil moisture and plant productivity -- which is directly related to the climate. We will want to be addressing these ultimate factors that are driving wildlife populations."


AI researchers want to study AI the same way social scientists study humans

#artificialintelligence

It's important to note that most of these ideas aren't new. Roboticists, for example, have long studied human-computer interaction. And the field of science, technology, and society have what's known as the "actor-network theory," a framework for describing everything in the social and natural worlds--both humans and algorithms--as actors that somehow relate to one another. But for the most part, each of these efforts have been siloed in separate disciplines. Bringing them together under one umbrella helps align their goals, formalize a common language, and foster interdisciplinary collaborations.


Second CRISPR human embryo study shows there is a long way to go

New Scientist

A team in China has announced the results of their attempts to modify human embryos using the CRISPR gene-editing technique – the second study of its kind. A team at the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University used CRISPR to try to introduce a mutation into human embryos that makes people immune to HIV. This mutation prevents people from making the CCRF receptor that normally lets the HIV virus into a cell. The team say they were trying to evaluate methods of precisely modifying early human embryos. But like the first study to be published on CRISPR editing in human embryos, this HIV work was done on embryos that had been rejected by IVF clinics because they had an extra set of chromosomes.


Second CRISPR human embryo study shows there is a long way to go

New Scientist

A team in China has announced the results of their attempts to modify human embryos using the CRISPR gene-editing technique – the second study of its kind. A team at the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University used CRISPR to try to introduce a mutation into human embryos that makes people immune to HIV. This mutation prevents people from making the CCRF receptor that normally lets the HIV virus into a cell. The team say they were trying to evaluate methods of precisely modifying early human embryos. But like the first study to be published on CRISPR editing in human embryos, this HIV work was done on embryos that had been rejected by IVF clinics because they had an extra set of chromosomes.