Video Friday: Rocket RoboBee, Willow Garage, and Caltech's Cassie

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next two months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. A new RoboBee from Harvard can swim underwater, and then launch itself into the air with a microrocket and fly away. At the millimeter scale, the water's surface might as well be a brick wall.


Watch amazing spiderman drone

FOX News

This little drone captures and defeats rogue drones'Spiderman'-style. Just like how Spidey slings a web to capture bad guys, this little drone shoots a net to stop dangerous flying drones. Revealed this week at the Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) event, the world's largest defense and security show held biennially in London, this smart drone is already drawing a lot of buzz. Made by Dutch company Delft Dynamics, the DroneCatcher project is supported by the Royal Netherlands Marechaussee (Military Police), the Dutch National Police and the Dutch Ministry of Safety and Justice. The DroneCatcher is a multicopter – it has multiple blades and can shoot up vertically in the air, kind of like a tiny helicopter.


Robotics News & Articles - IEEE Spectrum

AITopics Original Links

Video Friday: DLR Robot Car, Lady Gaga's Drone Swarm, and Cassie Does Squats How NASA's Astrobee Robot Is Bringing Useful Autonomy to the ISS Tackle This: Football's Newest Most Valuable Player Is a Robot Customized Drones Give Pilots an "Out of Body" Racing Experience Do We Want Robot Warriors to Decide Who Lives or Dies? Rethink's Robots Get Massive Software Upgrade, Rodney Brooks "So Excited" Piaggio's Cargo Robot Uses Visual SLAM to Follow You Anywhere


Video Friday: Atlas Jogging, Drive.ai Launch, and Robotic Warehouse

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. We'll also be posting a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months; here's what we have so far (send us your events!): Let us know if you have suggestions for next week, and enjoy today's videos. Boston Dynamics posted some awesome new videos this week; the first shows Atlas jogging (!): Jogging involves a flight phase, which means that the robot is spending time completely airborne during each gait cycle. It takes much more energy to do this relative to walking, which is more like a continuous controlled fall forward.


How NASA's Astrobee Robot Is Bringing Useful Autonomy to the ISS

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

Since 2006, NASA has had a trio of small, free-flying robots on board the International Space Station. Called SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites), these robots have spent about 600 hours participating in an enormous variety of experiments, including autonomous formation flying, navigation and mapping, and running programs written by middle school students in team competitions. But beyond serving as a scientific platform, SPHERES weren't designed to do anything especially practical in terms of assisting the astronauts or flight controllers, and it's time for a new generation of robotic free fliers that's fancier, more versatile, and will be a big help for the humans on the ISS. Last fall, IEEE Spectrum visited NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., to have a look at the latest Astrobee prototype and meet the team behind the robot. Astrobee is a cube about 32 centimeters on a side.