Goto

Collaborating Authors

Brazilian artist makes history feel like the present with beautiful colorized photos

#artificialintelligence

In 2016, we are overwhelmed with options for adding color to black-and-white photos. Cheap smartphone apps, artificial intelligence, and Photoshop knockoffs are accessible to amateurs and hobbyists, and YouTube is a constantly replenishing source of step-by-step tutorials. And yet, if you've tried colorization, you've likely discovered the finished result looks like highlighters scrubbed over an old newspaper. Yes, anybody can add color to old photos, but doing the job well remains a craft. Marina Amaral is a professional colorist.


Peter Jackson's colorized WWI documentary hits US theaters in December

Engadget

Peter Jackson's critically acclaimed World War I documentary They Shall Not Grow Old is slated to hit select theaters in the US this December. To give you a peek into what you can expect, Warner Bros. has released a trailer that shows the difference between the original footage Jackson worked with and the final product that made it into the film. They Shall Not Grow Old was met with critical acclaim when it premiered at the BFI London Film Festival, aired on BBC Two and was made available to stream via the network's iPlayer app. Jackson and his team were mainly praised for how they handled the digital restoration and colorization of the original 100-year-old footage the BBC used for its original 1964 documentary series The Great War. In addition to recoloring the film's frames as realistically as possible, Jackson and team used computers to build interstitial frames between real ones.


'The Dick Van Dyke Show' is back on CBS in living color

Los Angeles Times

Here's a spoiler alert TV fans didn't see coming in 2016 -- the ottoman Dick Van Dyke trips over in the opening titles of his classic 1960s sitcom is olive green. Several generations of viewers have enjoyed Van Dyke and costar Mary Tyler Moore on "The Dick Van Dyke Show," which 50 years after completing its initial run on CBS is still available on Hulu, Amazon, the nostalgia TV network Cozi and a recently released Blu-ray box set. But on Sunday, viewers will see the Petries' monochromatic world re-imagined in "The Dick Van Dyke Show -- Now In Living Color!" in which CBS debuts two digitally colorized episodes back-to-back. The original 1961 to 1966 run straddled the years when network TV series production converted to color. Some long-running sitcoms from the era such as "The Andy Griffith Show" and "Bewitched" made the switch after a few seasons on the air in black and white.


US troops in Pacific War revealed in re-colorized photos

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Fascinating re-colorized images have been released bringing the devastating battles of the Second World War in the Pacific back to life in incredible detail. The harrowing photos show US soldiers attempting to navigate their tanks and 4x4s through difficult jungle terrain in Papua New Guinea and a marine using a flamethrower on a Japanese position in the Philippines. And electrician Royston Leonard, 55, from Cardiff, Wales, who spent time restoring the pictures, believes the pictures give an accurate portrayal of the struggle faced by American troops in the Pacific theatre. There were around 36 million casualties during the Pacific War. Fascinating re-colorized images have been released bringing the devastating battles of the Second World War in the Pacific back to life in incredible detail. The harrowing photos reveal US soldiers attempting to navigate their tanks and 4x4s through difficult jungle terrain in Papua New Guinea and a fighter using a flamethrower on a Japanese position in the Philippines.


Colorized Footage Of 1911 New York Needs To Be Seen To Be Believed

#artificialintelligence

Footage taken of New York City has been colorized and upscaled using artificial intelligence (AI) more than 100 years after it was shot, and the results are astonishing. In 1911, Swedish production company Svenska Biografteatern visited the United States and shot extensive footage of the streets. Over a century later, still in mint condition, it was cut by YouTuber Guy Jones, and slowed down to a more natural speed. The result, A Trip Through New York City, can be viewed below. From that footage, another YouTuber (loving your work here YouTube, prefer this a lot to your anti-vaxx and pseudoscience content) was able to upscale and colorize it using neural networks.