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Artificial intelligence likely to help shape future battlefield, says Army vice chief

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Artificial intelligence will inevitably be one of those leap-ahead technologies that enable Soldiers to survive on the battlefield and win, said Vice Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. James C. McConville. McConville spoke here at the National Defender Investigator Association-sponsored Army Science & Technology Symposium and Showcase, Aug. 21. Artificial intelligence involves software algorithms that enable a computational device to learn as it processes information and to change courses of action automatically based on parameters set by the machine's designer. AI can process data at extremely high speeds as well. AI programs can also sift through enormous amounts of data, determine which data are important, simplify the data and present options to operators or commanders.


AI could be game-changer for combat, says acquisition chief

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The Army is looking at artificial intelligence to increase lethality, and a senior Army official said the key to A.I. is keeping a proper level of decision-making in the hands of Soldiers. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Dr. Bruce Jette spoke about artificial intelligence, modernization and acquisition reform Jan. 10 at a Defense Writers Group breakfast. Jette said response times against enemy fire could be a crucial element in determining the outcome of a battle, and A.I. could definitely assist with that. "A.I. is critically important," he said. "You'll hear a theme inside of ASA(ALT), 'time is a weapon.' That's one of the aspects that we're looking at with respect to A.I." Army Under Secretary Ryan McCarthy has been very active in positioning the Army so that it can pick up such critical new technology, Jette said.


AI could be game-changer for combat, says acquisition chief

#artificialintelligence

The Army is looking at artificial intelligence to increase lethality, and a senior Army official said the key to A.I. is keeping a proper level of decision-making in the hands of Soldiers. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology Dr. Bruce Jette spoke about artificial intelligence, modernization and acquisition reform Jan. 10 at a Defense Writers Group breakfast. Jette said response times against enemy fire could be a crucial element in determining the outcome of a battle, and A.I. could definitely assist with that. "A.I. is critically important," he said. "You'll hear a theme inside of ASA(ALT), 'time is a weapon.' That's one of the aspects that we're looking at with respect to A.I." Army Under Secretary Ryan McCarthy has been very active in positioning the Army so that it can pick up such critical new technology, Jette said.


Artificial Intelligence Helps Define Army's Future

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Artificial intelligence technology tested during the Army's Project Convergence exercise largely met expectations and will help transform the way the Army fights in the future, officials say. Army officials held a media roundtable September 23 to discuss lessons learned during the recently completed Project Convergence, which is designed to ensure the Army, as part of the joint force, can rapidly and continuously converge effects across all domains--air, land, maritime, space and cyberspace--to overmatch adversaries in both competition and actual conflict. A key part of the Army's massive modernization effort, the project focuses on people, weapons systems, information, command and control, and terrain to assess areas of advancement and identify areas for improvement. Artificial intelligence, or AI, played a role, along with autonomy and robotics, which Gen. John Murray, USA, commanding general, Army Futures Command, describes as three key technologies for the Army's future. Gen. Murray compares the trio of technological capabilities to those that gave the Germans an initial advantage during World War II.


Navy Aims to Fast-Track Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning to Maintain Dominance - Seapower

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Like a bolt from the blue, the Navy has a new modernization priority -- Project Overmatch, a campaign to accelerate delivery of artificial intelligence, machine learning and tools needed to allow the fleet to disperse forces, mass fires, integrate unmanned ships and, in the view of service leaders, maintain maritime dominance in the future. The project aims to begin delivering the Naval Operational Architecture (NOA), a lackluster name for a breathtaking effort whose results will determine nothing less than the service's future ability to establish and sustain sea control by integrating network infrastructure, data and analytic tools to provide decision-advantage in a fight. "Beyond recapitalizing our undersea nuclear deterrent, there is no higher developmental priority in the U.S. Navy," Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday wrote in Oct. 1, 2020, memo to Rear Adm. Douglas Small establishing Project Overmatch. "Your goal is to enable a Navy that swarms the sea, delivering synchronized lethal and nonlethal effects from near and far, every axis and every domain." Small, who in addition to heading Project Overmatch is head of Naval Information Warfare Systems Command, was further tasked by the CNO "to develop the networks, infrastructure, data architecture, tools, and analytics that support the operational and developmental environment that will enable our sustained maritime dominance." The two-star admiral says he has committed the memo to memory and, for good measure, carries a copy at all times.