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Who Is Pamela Taylor? West Virginia Nonprofit Director Who Made Racist 'Ape In Heels' Comment Fired

International Business Times

The director of a West Virginia nonprofit who called first lady Michelle Obama an "ape in heels" was fired, state officials said Tuesday. Pamela Taylor, who headed the Clay County Development Corp., was removed from her position as the result of an agreement between the state and the nonprofit's board of directors, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported. Taylor's racist Facebook post was not mentioned as a reason for her firing. Instead, Robert Roswall, state commissioner for senior services, said the Clay County agency had not been following nonprofit law, including violations of the open meetings act, the board's structure and refusal to respond to public records requests. "This was the best opportunity to make things right for people here," Roswall told MetroNews, adding Taylor's comment prompted people to start calling state officials to lodge complaints about how the agency was run.


Kona Bike-Share Program Rolls On, Looks at Expansion

U.S. News

The Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported (http://bit.ly/2wSrLTI Tina Clothier, the nonprofit's executive director, says the extension allows for long-term bike stations on county property and secures special management area exemptions. But more money is needed for expansion, which county officials say won't come from them.


How Private Money From Facebook's CEO Saved The 2020 Election

NPR Technology

Detroit election workers count absentee ballots for the 2020 general election at TCF Center on Nov. 4. Election offices around the U.S. say they couldn't have carried out this year's challenging election without help from a nonprofit tied to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Detroit election workers count absentee ballots for the 2020 general election at TCF Center on Nov. 4. Election offices around the U.S. say they couldn't have carried out this year's challenging election without help from a nonprofit tied to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Turner knew he had a tough job.



Former L.A. City Council aide, wife acquitted of embezzlement in corruption case

Los Angeles Times

A jury Tuesday acquitted a longtime Los Angeles lobbyist and former L.A. City Council aide accused of corruption, rejecting charges that he and his wife participated in a scheme to help an elected water board member siphon thousands of dollars in public money for personal use. After more than two days of deliberation in a Torrance courthouse, jurors found Robert Katherman Jr., 69, and his wife, Marilyn, 67, not guilty of felony counts of misappropriation of public funds and embezzlement. A third defendant, Ronald Craig Smith, treasurer of the West Basin Municipal Water District, pleaded guilty in 2014 to embezzling nearly 20,000 from the agency. A former lobbyist who spent the last year working for Los Angeles City Councilman Curren Price was charged Tuesday in what prosecutors described as an elaborate embezzlement scheme that funneled thousands of dollars in public funds to a water district board member. A former lobbyist who spent the last year working for Los Angeles City Councilman Curren Price was charged Tuesday in what prosecutors described as an elaborate embezzlement scheme that funneled thousands of dollars in public funds to a water district board member.