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Spy agency: Artificial intelligence is already a vital part of our missions

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The UK's GCHQ has revealed how AI is set be used to boost national security. The UK's top intelligence and security body, GCHQ, is betting big on artificial intelligence: the organization has revealed how it wants to use AI to boost national security. In a new paper titled "Pioneering a New National Security," GCHQ's analysts went to lengths to explain why AI holds the key to better protection of the nation. The volumes of data that the organization deals with, argued GCHQ, places security agencies and law enforcement bodies under huge pressure; AI could ease that burden, improving not only the speed, but also the quality of experts' decision making. "AI, like so many technologies, offers great promise for society, prosperity and security. It's impact on GCHQ is equally profound," said Jeremy Fleming, the director of GCHQ.


Spy agency: Artificial intelligence is already a vital part of our missions

ZDNet

The UK's GCHQ has revealed how AI is set be used to boost national security. The UK's top intelligence and security body, GCHQ, is betting big on artificial intelligence: the organization has revealed how it wants to use AI to boost national security. In a new paper titled "Pioneering a New National Security," GCHQ's analysts went to lengths to explain why AI holds the key to better protection of the nation. The volumes of data that the organization deals with, argued GCHQ, places security agencies and law enforcement bodies under huge pressure; AI could ease that burden, improving not only the speed, but also the quality of experts' decision-making. "AI, like so many technologies, offers great promise for society, prosperity and security. It's impact on GCHQ is equally profound," said Jeremy Fleming, the director of GCHQ.


The new weapon in the fight against crime

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The images on Eduardo Fidalgo's computer show mundane scenes – a sofa scattered with pillows, a folded duvet on a bed, some children's toys strewn across a floor. They depict views most of us would see around our own homes. But these rather ordinary pictures are helping to build a new weapon in the fight against crime. Fidalgo and his colleagues are using the images to train a machine to spot clues in crime scene photographs. When police officers visit a crime scene or a suspect's home, they are often confronted with an overwhelming amount of visual information.


Improving Law Enforcement Intelligence Gathering and Use with Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) and…

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As society has evolved, technology has as well, and there is a growing awareness that already-established police techniques -- if used exclusively -- are somewhat out-of-date and oftentimes quite expensive for what they offer. When departments sink valuable resources into maintaining old systems instead of investing into newer, more efficient, and cost-effective technologies -- especially in an era of budget cuts where law enforcement agencies are forced to make difficult decisions as to where to cut funding -- these agencies are missing out on a valuable source of information. One only needs to look at history to witness the evolution of criminal investigations. Fingerprinting, DNA analysis, and computer information systems such as CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) and NDIS (National DNA Index System) have improved investigatory efforts considerably; however, as technology continues to evolve -- and criminals are openly taking advantage of this new technology -- law enforcement agencies may be missing out on a valuable opportunity if they don't embrace more openly the tremendous benefits such new technology brings. The United States spends more than $100 billion annually on law enforcement and incarceration, and this figure does not even consider other economic impacts of crime in terms of victims' costs, property devaluation, and higher outlays for companies to ensure their security.