Making Law for Thinking Machines? Start with the Guns - Netopia

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The Bank of England's warning that the pace of artificial intelligence development now threatens 15m UK jobs has prompted calls for political intervention.


Predicting the future of artificial intelligence has always been a fool's game

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From the Darmouth Conferences to Turing's test, prophecies about AI have rarely hit the mark. In 1956, a bunch of the top brains in their field thought they could crack the challenge of artificial intelligence over a single hot New England summer. Almost 60 years later, the world is still waiting. The "spectacularly wrong prediction" of the Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence made Stuart Armstrong, research fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute at University of Oxford, start to think about why our predictions about AI are so inaccurate. The Dartmouth Conference had predicted that over two summer months ten of the brightest people of their generation would solve some of the key problems faced by AI developers, such as getting machines to use language, form abstract concepts and even improve themselves.


Can Artificial Intelligence Replace The Content Writer?

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You don't have to look far to find statistics and predictions on the future impact of artificial intelligence (AI). But while self-driving cars and augmented reality headsets have excited consumers, enterprise headlines have focused more on the risk that it poses to workers. Analyst giant Forrester have claimed that 16% of jobs in the U.S. will be lost to artificial intelligence by 2025. Meanwhile, a recent report from PwC stated 30% of jobs in the UK were under threat from AI breakthroughs, putting 10 million British workers at risk of being'replaced by robots' in the next 15 years. We shouldn't expect a wide-scale revolution of robot workers across the entire workplace, of course.


The Future of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

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His research focuses at the intersection of computer vision, AI, machine learning, and graphics, with particular emphasis on systems that allow people to interact naturally with computers. These projects include the UK's biometric matching system and the International Technology Alliance research programme into novel sensor networks. Dr Waggett has extensive experience of innovative IT systems, including research into image processing at University College London and the Marconi Research Centre. His work includes responsibility for the delivery of innovative systems for a range of government and commercial organisations and he has been the Big Data subject matter expert for a range of projects and clients including the UK's biometric visa matching system.


Missing man's police drone rescue in Norfolk 'a miracle'

BBC News

The wife of a missing man who was located by a police drone up to his armpits in mud said it was "a miracle" he was found alive. A major search was launched for Peter Pugh, 75, from Brancaster, Norfolk, after he disappeared following a beach walk on Saturday at 17:10 BST. It was only when the drone was sent up that Mr Pugh was spotted in a muddy creek at Titchwell Marshes on Sunday. Police said the technology was key to their rescue operation. Mr Pugh's wife Felicity said her husband, who is still in hospital in King's Lynn with hypothermia, was "slightly bemused" by what had happened.