Robot bridge inspector uses sensors and machine learning to hunt for defects

@machinelearnbot

Robot bridge inspector uses sensors and machine learning to hunt for defects Researchers at the University of Nevada have developed an autonomous robot, designed to inspect bridges and detect any structural damage before it can cause potential injury. The four-wheeled robot bridge inspector, called Seekur, uses a variety of tools to carry out its important task. Researchers at the University of Nevada have developed an autonomous robot, designed to inspect bridges and detect any structural damage before it can cause potential injury. The four-wheeled robot bridge inspector, called Seekur, uses a variety of tools to carry out its important task.


Robot bridge inspector uses sensors and machine learning to hunt for defects

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous bridge-inspecting robot could save lives by using smart sensors and machine learning algorithms to detect dangerous defects. Researchers at the University of Nevada have developed an autonomous robot, designed to inspect bridges and detect any structural damage before it can cause potential injury. The four-wheeled robot bridge inspector, called Seekur, uses a variety of tools to carry out its important task. These include ground-penetrating radar for looking beneath the surface of a bridge for underlying instabilities, sensors designed to search for possible corrosion of steel or cement, and a camera which analyzes cracks in the bridge's surface. A machine learning algorithm then analyzes all of this information and uses it to generate a color-coded map, which is passed on to (human) engineers to make them aware of weak spots.


Robot inspector is checking bridges with 96% accuracy

Daily Mail - Science & tech

There are nearly 56,000 defective bridges currently being used in the US and unsuspecting vehicles travel across them about 185 million time a day – but these structures could go at any moment. However, a team of researchers have designed a'robot bridge inspector' that is said to cut down on the costs for inspections and is able to thoroughly check for corrosion and other faults in the structure with 96 percent accuracy. Called Seekur Jr, the autonomous machine is equipped with a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion. Researchers have designed a'robot bridge inspector' that is said to cut down on the costs for inspections and is able to thoroughly check for corrosion and other faults in the structure - with 96 percent accuracy The University of Nevada designed a'robot bridge inspector' to check bridges for corrosion and other faults. Seekur has a camera for visual crack detection, ground penetrating radar for concrete rebar assessment and unique sensors for concrete corrosion.


Thirty Meter Telescope Project Is Stalled, but the Robot Needed to Build It Is Ready

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

The prosaically named Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project, a planned observatory to be built on Mauna Kea, the Big Island, in Hawaii, is huge in every way: a reported US 1.4 billion dollar budget, a giant mirror composed of 492 smaller mirror segments, and a goal of investigating not just the stars in our Milky Way but galaxies forming at the very edge of the observable universe. Though this project is backed by the governments of China, Japan, Canada, and India, as well as the United States, it may never be built. For its location is considered sacred by some Hawaiians, whose protests have been heard all the way to the State Supreme Court of Hawaii, which in December 2015 invalidated TMT's previously granted building permit. With the project suspended for over a year, involved scientist and construction companies can only keep their fingers crossed that the contested case will go their way. In the meantime, Mitsubishi Electric, which has developed the main structure of TMT, announced this week the completion of a prototype robot for a segmented-handling system (SHS) to install and replace the mirror segments.


Yes, the Robots Are Coming for Our Jobs, But Just the Boring Ones

#artificialintelligence

Which of America's bridges are getting ready to collapse? More than 600,000 bridges in the U.S. are due for inspection. Traditionally, divers are sent out to visually examine the bridges' underwater structures. The work is time-consuming, expensive, and tedious, and can be dangerous. Karl von Ellenrieder and his team at Florida Atlantic University's Dania Beach campus are working on a fleet of intelligent, autonomous boats that could replace many of those divers.