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Apple Watch 97% Accurate In Diagnosing Irregular Heartbeat, Study Says

International Business Times

Apple Watch might be more than a fancy accessory for your wrist. The device could be of great help to heart patients, according to a'Health e-heart' study conducted by University of California, San Francisco, which finds that the device is 97 percent accurate in diagnosing irregular heartbeat. "Our results show that common wearable trackers like smartwatches present a novel opportunity to monitor, capture and prompt medical therapy for atrial fibrillation without any active effort from patients. While mobile technology screening won't replace more conventional monitoring methods, it has the potential to successfully screen those at an increased risk and lower the number of undiagnosed cases of AF," the report's senior author, Gregory M. Marcus, MD, MAS Endowed Professor of Atrial Fibrillation Research and Director of Clinical Research for the Division of Cardiology at UCSF, said in the findings published Wednesday. The research trained a deep neural network (DNN) and paired it with the Apple Watch and Cardiogram app.


AI used to create 'digital twin' hearts that let surgeons test out their technique

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Armed with a mouse and computer screen instead of a scalpel and operating theatre, cardiologist Benjamin Meder carefully places the electrodes of a pacemaker in a beating, digital heart. Using this'digital twin' that mimics the electrical and physical properties of the cells in patient 7497's heart, Meder runs simulations to see if the pacemaker can keep the congestive heart failure sufferer alive - before he has inserted a knife. The digital heart twin developed by Siemens Healthineers is one example of how medical device makers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to help doctors make more precise diagnoses as medicine enters an increasingly personalized age. Siemens Healthineers has built up a vast database of more than 250 million annotated images, reports and operational data on which to train its new algorithms. In the example of the digital twin, the AI system was trained to weave together data about the electrical and physical properties and the structure of a heart into a 3D image.


Artificial intelligence predicts when heart will fail - BBC News

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence can predict when patients with a heart disorder will die, according to scientists. The software learned to analyse blood tests and scans of beating hearts to spot signs that the organ was about to fail. The team, from the UK's Medical Research Council, say the technology could save lives by finding patients that need more aggressive treatment. The results were published in the journal Radiology. The researchers, at the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, were investigating patients with pulmonary hypertension.


Medtech firms get personal with digital twins

#artificialintelligence

HEIDELBERG, Germany (Reuters) - Armed with a mouse and computer screen instead of a scalpel and operating theater, cardiologist Benjamin Meder carefully places the electrodes of a pacemaker in a beating, digital heart. Using this "digital twin" that mimics the electrical and physical properties of the cells in patient 7497's heart, Meder runs simulations to see if the pacemaker can keep the congestive heart failure sufferer alive - before he has inserted a knife. The digital heart twin developed by Siemens Healthineers is one example of how medical device makers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to help doctors make more precise diagnoses as medicine enters an increasingly personalized age. The challenge for Siemens Healthineers and rivals such as Philips and GE Healthcare is to keep an edge over tech giants from Alphabet's Google to Alibaba that hope to use big data to grab a slice of healthcare spending. With healthcare budgets under increasing pressure, AI tools such as the digital heart twin could save tens of thousands of dollars by predicting outcomes and avoiding unnecessary surgery.


Artificial intelligence to the rescue in medtech

#artificialintelligence

Armed with a mouse and computer screen instead of a scalpel and operating theatre, cardiologist Benjamin Meder carefully places the electrodes of a pacemaker in a beating, digital heart. Using this "digital twin" that mimics the electrical and physical properties of the cells in patient 7497's heart, Meder runs simulations to see if the pacemaker can keep the congestive heart failure sufferer alive, before he has inserted a knife. The digital heart twin developed by Siemens Healthineers is one example of how medical device makers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to help doctors make more precise diagnoses as medicine enters an increasingly personalised age. The challenge for Siemens Healthineers and rivals such as Philips and GE Healthcare is to keep an edge over tech giants from Alphabet's Google to Alibaba that hope to use big data to grab a slice of healthcare spending. With healthcare budgets under increasing pressure, AI tools such as the digital heart twin could save tens of thousands of dollars by predicting outcomes and avoiding unnecessary surgery.