Roberts, target of Trump jabs, meeting Trump at Capitol

U.S. News

FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2016 file photo, U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington. Roberts will administer the presidential oath to President-elect Donald Trump on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.


Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Briefed on Russia Trump Tower Deal

U.S. News

Discussions concerning the Trump Tower deal in Moscow continued through at least November 2016, but the project was ultimately scuttled. The interactions have remained a central focus of inquiries into Trump's interactions with the Russian government and potential collusion between the Kremlin and members of the Trump campaign.


Will Trump's Rule of Law Be Our Rule of Law?

Slate

Like Andrew Sullivan, I hold out very little hope that most Republicans in Congress will be anything but supine for President Trump as he begins to unspool his broad, unspecified plans to singlehandedly enact unconstitutional stop-and-frisk laws nationwide or to unilaterally dismantle the First Amendment protections for journalists, even though he has no authority to do so. I don't believe he will build a wall and make Mexico pay for it, but I don't believe the new Congress would stand up to him to stop that, or his reinstitution of torture, or his immigration dragnets, if he wanted to try. I believe that if President Trump instructs his special prosecutor Chris Christie or Rudy Giuliani to find a way to lock Hillary Clinton up, he would do so, gleefully, and that many millions of people will look on and feel that justice--whatever that means going forward--was done.


5 Things That Explain Donald Trump's Presidential Election Victory

U.S. News

But as it turned out, he didn't need an organization. Trump has been in the public eye for over 30 years, which meant that he entered the race with nearly 100 percent name recognition. Trump's longstanding status as a celebrity enabled him to garner relentless media attention from the moment he entered the race. One study found that by May 2016 Trump had received the equivalent of $3 billion in free advertising from the media coverage his campaign commanded. Trump seemed to intuitively understand that the controversial things he said on the campaign trail captured the voters' attention in a way that serious policy speeches never could.


What Trump Supporters Really Believe

Slate

In the PPP survey, 1 percent of people who voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016 express a favorable opinion of neo-Nazis. Among whites, 4 percent express such an opinion. Among people who voted for Trump, however, it's 7 percent. It just means that Nazi sympathies among whites are concentrated in the pro-Trump contingent.) In the Morning Consult poll, 3 percent of conservatives, 5 percent of whites, and 6 percent of Republicans admit to a favorable impression of neo-Nazis.