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Robots, AI, and the road to a fully autonomous construction industry

#artificialintelligence

Built Robotics executives are fond of saying that their autonomous system for construction equipment, like dozers and excavators, might be further along than many autonomous vehicles. In fact, CEO Noah Ready-Campbell insists you'll see autonomous vehicles in controlled industrial environments -- like construction sites -- before you see level 5 driverless cars on public roads. That may be in part because autonomous construction equipment often operates on privately owned land, while public roads face increased regulatory scrutiny. "There's a quote that'Cold fusion is 20 years in the future and always will be,'" Ready-Campbell told VentureBeat. "I think there's a chance that that might be true for level 5 self-driving cars as well."


Robots break new ground in construction industry

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As a teenager working for his dad's construction business, Noah Ready-Campbell dreamed that robots could take over the dirty, tedious parts of his job, such as digging and leveling soil for building projects. Now the former Google engineer is turning that dream into a reality with Built Robotics, a startup that's developing technology to allow bulldozers, excavators and other construction vehicles to operate themselves. 'The idea behind Built Robotics is to use automation technology make construction safer, faster and cheaper,' said Ready-Campbell, standing in a dirt lot where a small bulldozer moved mounds of earth without a human operator. The San Francisco startup is part of a wave of automation that's transforming the construction industry, which has lagged behind other sectors in technological innovation. Backed by venture capital, tech startups are developing robots, drones, software and other technologies to help the construction industry to boost speed, safety and productivity.


Robots break new ground in construction industry

#artificialintelligence

As a teenager working for his dad's construction business, Noah Ready-Campbell dreamed that robots could take over the dirty, tedious parts of his job, such as digging and leveling soil for building projects. Now the former Google engineer is turning that dream into a reality with Built Robotics, a startup that's developing technology to allow bulldozers, excavators and other construction vehicles to operate themselves. "The idea behind Built Robotics is to use automation technology make construction safer, faster and cheaper," said Ready-Campbell, standing in a dirt lot where a small bulldozer moved mounds of earth without a human operator. The San Francisco startup is part of a wave of automation that's transforming the construction industry, which has lagged behind other sectors in technological innovation. Backed by venture capital, tech startups are developing robots, drones, software and other technologies to help the construction industry to boost speed, safety and productivity.


Productivity boost? Robots break new ground in the construction industry

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Robots have moved into factories, warehouses, stores and even our homes. Tech startups are developing self-driving bulldozers, drones to inspect work sites and robot bricklayers. In this photo taken Jan. 26, 2018, Mike Moy, an assistant plant manager for Lehigh Hanson Cement Group, inspects a Kespry drone he uses to survey inventories of rock, sand and other building materials at a mining plant in Sunol, California. Robots are coming to a construction site near you. Tech startups are developing self-driving bulldozers, survey drones and bricklaying robots to help the construction industry boost productivity, speed and safety as it struggles to find enough skilled workers.


Robotic excavators get a boost with $33 million for Built Robotics ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

When Built Robotics emerged out of stealth in October 2017, the company's self-driving excavators had completed a couple simple projects that included digging and moving dirt at a community garden and a California mountain bike trail. Since then, giant autonomous robots have been deployed on large commercial projects, such as digging the foundations for wind farms. The technology has also expanded to include bulldozers and skid steers, in addition to excavators. Today Built announced a $33 million Series B led by Next47, the new global venture fund backed by Siemens. This brings the company's total funding to $48 million.