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Enterprises Can't Get Enough AI Talent -- ADTmag

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Artificial intelligence is one of the hottest areas in software development right now, and employers just can't get enough AI skills, confirms a new report on research report on enterprise hiring trends.


Top Employers for Artificial Intelligence (A.I.), Machine Learning Jobs

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Let's say you're interested in working with artificial intelligence (A.I.), perhaps with a focus on machine learning. Although the market for A.I. skills remains relatively small, those who've mastered the core concepts can potentially earn quite a bit in compensation--and work on some very cool projects. Even if you have the right skills, though, where do you even begin looking for jobs? Many companies don't bother to post their A.I.-related jobs publicly, since they often have a candidate already in mind for the role. Other A.I. specialists are drawn directly from academia.


How Artificial Intelligence is creating jobs, not killing

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Dozens of employers looking to hire the next generation of tech employees descended on the University of California, Berkeley in September to meet students at an electrical engineering and computer science career fair. Boris Yue, 20, was one of thousands of student attendees, threading his way among fellow job-seekers to meet recruiters. But Yue wasn't worried about so much potential competition. While the job outlook for those with computer skills is generally good, Yue is in an even more rarified category: he is studying artificial intelligence, working on technology that teaches machines to learn and think in ways that mimic human cognition. His choice of specialty makes it unlikely he will have difficulty finding work.


As companies embrace AI, it's a job-seeker's market

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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Dozens of employers looking to hire the next generation of tech employees descended on the University of California, Berkeley in September to meet students at an electrical engineering and computer science career fair. Boris Yue, 20, was one of thousands of student attendees, threading his way among fellow job-seekers to meet recruiters. But Yue wasn't worried about so much potential competition. While the job outlook for those with computer skills is generally good, Yue is in an even more rarified category: he is studying artificial intelligence, working on technology that teaches machines to learn and think in ways that mimic human cognition. His choice of specialty makes it unlikely he will have difficulty finding work.


As Companies Pour Millions into A.I., Job Opportunities Abound

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Artificial intelligence (A.I.) isn't just some abstract concept or parlor trick: More enterprises are spending millions of dollars on the technology, according to a new report by analyst firm Deloitte. Specifically, Deloitte says that 53 percent of the enterprises it surveyed for its new "State of AI in the Enterprise" survey (PDF) spent more than $20 million over the past 12 months on A.I.-related technology and talent. "Seventy-one percent of adopters expect to increase their investment in the next fiscal year, by an average of 26 percent," the survey stated, adding that A.I. isn't a cost-sink for some firms, either: "Seasoned adopters also typically achieve payback on their investments in a shorter amount of time, with 81 percent reporting their payback period is less than two years." How exactly is that "payback" achieved? Cost savings is a huge part of it; A.I. and machine learning allow companies to refine and accelerate processes, preserving cash.