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How the U.S. Can Advance Artificial Intelligence Without Spending a Dime

#artificialintelligence

Federal officials have largely come around to the idea that research funding is crucial for U.S. leadership in artificial intelligence, but there are ways to accelerate innovation besides pouring in more money, according to tech experts. For one, they said, the government could map a long-term strategy for advancing the technology. "The U.S. has been slow in making this a national imperative," Dean Garfield, president and CEO of the Information Technology Industry Council, said Thursday on a panel hosted by Politico. "The signal that comes from the top … is critically important here and has the opportunity to really catalyze that action in a way that wouldn't happen without it." The Office of Science and Technology Policy on Wednesday requested industry input on updating an AI research and development strategy the White House published in 2016.


The 7 Most Promising Government Led AI Solutions

#artificialintelligence

As the 21st century rages on, success and failure of nations depends not only on their citizenry and governmental leadership, but heavily on the technological visions that countries embrace. If a nation takes the approach of sitting back or standing still as automation and Artificial Intelligence advance at ever increasing rates, that nation is destined to be left behind. However, if a country embraces AI and dedicates significant resources and top minds to ethical implementation, that country is destined to be a leader for decades to come. Recently Steve Mills, Chief AI Ethics Officer & Leader for Artificial Intelligence in the Public Sector, and Partner at Boston Consulting Group said quite eloquently "AI has become table stages for global national economic and technological competitiveness. This goes beyond nations capturing a piece of the large and rapidly growing AI market. AI is poised to transform nearly every industry. There is an imperative for nations to position themselves to integrate AI into these sectors. Particularly those sectors that are economically important to them. Failing to do so could erode their competitive position, creating opportunities for other, more technologically advanced nations to fill the void. This is not just a matter of missed upside potential from the new AI market. It's also about downside risk for every other sector that is economically important to a nation."


The 7 Most Promising Government Led AI Solutions

#artificialintelligence

As the 21st century rages on, success and failure of nations depends not only on their citizenry and governmental leadership, but heavily on the technological visions that countries embrace. If a nation takes the approach of sitting back or standing still as automation and Artificial Intelligence advance at ever increasing rates, that nation is destined to be left behind. However, if a country embraces AI and dedicates significant resources and top minds to ethical implementation, that country is destined to be a leader for decades to come. Recently Steve Mills, Chief AI Ethics Officer & Leader for Artificial Intelligence in the Public Sector, and Partner at Boston Consulting Group said quite eloquently "AI has become table stages for global national economic and technological competitiveness. This goes beyond nations capturing a piece of the large and rapidly growing AI market. AI is poised to transform nearly every industry. There is an imperative for nations to position themselves to integrate AI into these sectors. Particularly those sectors that are economically important to them. Failing to do so could erode their competitive position, creating opportunities for other, more technologically advanced nations to fill the void. This is not just a matter of missed upside potential from the new AI market. It's also about downside risk for every other sector that is economically important to a nation."


Trump Administration Vows to Maintain U.S. Edge in AI Technology

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

WASHINGTON--White House officials promised to keep the U.S. in the lead on emerging artificial-intelligence technologies, despite growing competition from China and worries about potential impacts on American workers. At a White House conference on artificial intelligence, Trump technology adviser Michael Kratsios pledged that the administration would make a priority of advancing artificial-intelligence research, through greater research funding and other steps. "America has been the global leader in AI, and the Trump administration will ensure our great nation remains the global leader in AI," said Mr. Kratsios, deputy assistant to the president for technology policy, according to prepared text of a keynote speech. In addition to increased federal funding, Mr. Kratsios raised the possibility that AI researchers might eventually gain expanded access to the government's network of national labs, and also the government's "vast troves of taxpayer-funded data, in ways that don't compromise privacy or security." Artificial intelligence is software that enables computers to emulate human intelligence, handling tasks such as recognizing and processing images or language in applications including autonomous driving.


One Thing Biden and Trump Seem to Agree On: We Need to Focus on Innovation

Slate

On Wednesday at noon Eastern, Future Tense will host an hourlong online discussion about the relationship between the U.S. government, national security, and private industry. When in 1791 Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton presented his plan to Congress to develop a U.S. manufacturing sector, he kick-started a debate about the role of the federal government in industrial policy that has run consistently through the history of the republic. In recent years, though, despite the examples of industrial policy enthusiasts like Abraham Lincoln and Dwight D. Eisenhower, the prevailing political climate--driven by the Tea Party's influence on congressional Republicans--has been to largely reject the idea that government should "interfere" with the free market at all. In practice, the federal government has continued a wide range of measures that support industry, especially in the defense sector. Nevertheless, such has been the political climate that even the Obama administration's investments to promote recovery from the 2008 financial crisis (especially under the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) became the fodder for bitter partisan controversy, with 2012 vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan declaring during the campaign that "the big problems we have today … [is] … [p]icking winners and losers in the economy through spending, through tax breaks, through regulations does not work." As a result, not only has there been a lack of public discussion, beyond a small group of academic and think tankers, about how the U.S. should run its industrial strategy, but there has been even less effort to optimize the federal government's ability to do that.