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Meet the New Robots

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General Motors' implementation of flexible robotic automation in Ternstedt, N.J., started U.S. manufacturing on the path to realizing a future depicted in a 1923 play by Karel Capek. In "R.U.R." (Rossum's Universal Robot), Capek's vision was for millions of mechanical workers -- robots (as derived from the Czech words for work or workers). Although U.S. robot numbers are not yet measured in millions, the industrial automatons are nonetheless playing strategic roles in U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, says Jeffrey A. Burnstein, executive vice president, Robotic Industries Association. RIA estimates that more than 171,000 robots are now at work in U.S. factories, placing the U.S. second only to Japan in overall robot use. Worldwide, there are more than a million industrial robots in operation, Burnstein notes.


Top Computer Vision Trends for the Modern Enterprise

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The increased sophistication of artificial neural networks (ANNs) coupled with the availability of AI-powered chips have driven am unparalleled enterprise interest in computer vision (CV). This exciting new technology will find myriad applications in several industries, and according to GlobalData forecasts, it would reach a market size of $28bn by 2030. The increasing adoption of AI-powered computer vision solutions, consumer drones; and the rising Industry 4.0 adoption will drive this phenomenal change. Deep learning has bought a new change in the role of machine vision used for smart manufacturing and industrial automation. The integration of deep learning propels machine vision systems to adapt itself to manufacturing variations.


Computer Vision In Python! Face Detection & Image Processing

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Master Python By Implementing Face Recognition & Image Processing In Python Created by Emenwa Global Students also bought Deep Learning and Computer Vision A-Z: OpenCV, SSD & GANs Python for Computer Vision with OpenCV and Deep Learning Deep Learning: Advanced Computer Vision (GANs, SSD, More!) Autonomous Cars: Deep Learning and Computer Vision in PythonPreview this course Udemy GET COUPON CODE Computer vision is an interdisciplinary field that deals with how computers can be made to gain high-level understanding from digital images or videos. From the perspective of engineering, it seeks to automate tasks that the human visual system can do. Computer vision is concerned with the automatic extraction, analysis and understanding of useful information from a single image or a sequence of images. It involves the development of a theoretical and algorithmic basis to achieve automatic visual understanding. As a scientific discipline, computer vision is concerned with the theory behind artificial systems that extract information from images. The image data can take many forms, such as video sequences, views from multiple cameras, or multi-dimensional data from a medical scanner.


Vision Online

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Advances in 3D imaging have allowed vision users to overcome some challenging inspection tasks. In the machine vision marketplace, 3D imaging continues to mature, tackling applications 2D imaging cannot. "In a manufacturing setting, the fusion of 2D with 3D is necessary to measure how well components go together into an assembly and assess the product for final fit, finish, and packaging," says Terry Arden, CEO of LMI Technologies. According to David Dechow, Principal Vision Systems Architect at Integro Technologies, a systems integrator specializing in machine vision technologies with broad experience in helping companies implement 3D and 2D imaging for industrial automation, accuracy has improved as well. And with inspection tasks in 3D space, which may include measurement or reconstruction, precision is even more essential than with most tasks in robotic guidance or bin picking.


Through the eyes of machines Imaging and Machine Vision Europe

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Imaging in three dimensions rather than two offers numerous advantages for machines working in the factories of the future by granting them a whole new perspective to view the world. Combined with embedded processing and deep learning, this new perspective could soon allow robots to navigate and work in factories autonomously by enabling them to detect and interact with objects, anticipate human movements and understand given gesture commands. Certain challenges must first be overcome to unlock this promising potential, however, such as ensuring standardisation across large sensing ecosystems and increasing widespread understanding of what 3D vision can do within industry. Three-dimensional imaging can be achieved by a variety of formats, each using different mechanics to capture depth information. Imaging firm Framos was recently announced as a supplier of Intel's RealSense stereovision technology, which uses two cameras and a special purpose ASIC processor to calculate a 3D point cloud from the data of the two perspectives.